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RSSFeline Behaviour

Feline Social Behavior and Aggression Between Family Cats

| February 22, 2011
Cats are very territorial, much more so than dogs. Territorial aggression occurs when a cat feels that his territory has been invaded by an intruder.

Cats are very territorial, much more so than dogs. Territorial aggression occurs when a cat feels that his territory has been invaded by an intruder.

It’s impossible to estimate how well any particular pair or group of cats will ultimately tolerate each other. Some cats are unusually territorial, may never adjust to sharing their house, and may do best in a one-cat family. However, many aggressive problems between cats can be successfully resolved. To do this, you may need help, both from your veterinarian and from an animal behavior specialist who is knowledgeable in cat behavior. Cats with aggression problems may never be best friends, but can often learn to mutually tolerate each other with a minimum of conflict. Working with aggression problems between family cats will take time and commitment from you. Don’t give up without consulting the appropriate experts.
Common Types Of Aggressive Behaviors Between Cats

Territorial Aggression: Cats are very territorial, much more so than dogs. Territorial aggression occurs when a cat feels that his territory has been invaded by an intruder. Depending on where your cat spends his time, he may view your whole neighborhood as his territory. Female cats can be just as territorial as males. The behavior patterns in this type of aggression include chasing and ambushing the intruder, as well as hissing and swatting when contact occurs. Territorial problems often occur when a new cat is brought into a household, when a young kitten reaches maturity, or when a cat encounters neighborhood cats outside. It’s not uncommon for a cat to be territorially aggressive toward one cat in a family, and friendly and tolerant to another.

Intermale Aggression: Adult male cats normally tend to threaten, and sometimes fight with, other males. These behaviors can occur as sexual challenges over a female, or to achieve a relatively high position in the cats’ loosely organized social dominance hierarchy. This type of aggression involves much ritualized body posturing, stalking, staring, yowling and howling. Attacks are usually avoided if one cat “backs down” and walks away. If an attack occurs, the attacker will usually jump forward, directing a bite to the nape of the neck, while the opponent falls to the ground on his back and attempts to bite and scratch the attacker’s belly with his hind legs. The cats may roll around biting and screaming, suddenly stop, resume posturing, fight again or walk away. Cats don’t usually severely injure one another this way, but you should always check for puncture wounds which are prone to infection. Intact males are much more likely to fight in this way than are neutered males.

Defensive Aggression: Defensive aggression occurs when a cat is attempting to protect himself from an attack he believes he cannot escape. This can occur in response to punishment or the threat of punishment from a person, an attack or attempted attack from another cat, or any time he feels threatened or afraid. Defensive postures include crouching with the legs pulled in under the body, laying the ears back, tucking the tail, and possibly rolling slightly to the side. This is not the same as the submissive postures dogs show because it’s not intended to “turn off” an attack from another cat. Continuing to approach a cat that’s in this posture is likely to precipitate an attack.

Redirected Aggression: This type of aggression is directed toward another animal that didn’t initially provoke the behavior. For example, a household cat sitting in the window may see an outdoor cat walk across the front yard. Because he can’t attack the outdoor cat, he may instead turn and attack the other family cat that’s sitting next to him in the window. Redirected aggression can be either offensive or defensive in nature.
What You Can Do

  • If your cat’s behavior changes suddenly, your first step should always be to contact your veterinarian for a thorough health examination. Cats often hide symptoms of illness until they’re seriously ill. Any change in behavior may be an early indication of a medical problem.
  • Spay or neuter any intact pets in your home. The behavior of one intact animal can affect all of your pets.
  • Start the slow introduction process over from the beginning (see our handout: “Introducing Your New Cat to Your Other Pets”). You may need professional help from an animal behavior specialist to successfully implement these techniques.
  • In extreme cases, consult with your veterinarian about medicating your cats while you’re working with them on a behavior modification program. Your veterinarian is the only person who is licensed and qualified to prescribe any medication for your cats. Don’t attempt to give your cat any over-the-counter or prescription medication without consulting with your veterinarian. Animals don’t respond to drugs the same way people do, and a medication that may be safe for a human could be fatal to an animal. Keep in mind that medication, by itself, isn’t a permanent solution, and should only be used in conjunction with behavior modification.

What Not To Do

  • If your cats are fighting, don’t allow the fights to continue. Because cats are so territorial, and because they don’t establish firm dominance hierarchies, they won’t be able to “work things out” as dogs sometimes do. The more often cats fight, the worse the problem is likely to become. To stop a fight in progress, make a loud noise, such as blowing a whistle, squirting the cats with water, or throwing something soft at them. Don’t try to pull them apart.
  • Prevent future fights. This may mean keeping the cats totally separated from each other while you’re working on the problem, or at least preventing contact between them in situations likely to triger a fight.
  • Don’t try to punish the cats involved. Punishment is likely to elicit further aggression and fearful responses, which will only make the problem worse. If you attempt punishment, you may become a target for redirected and defensive aggression.

Because their social organization is somewhat flexible, some cats are relatively tolerant of sharing their house and territory with multiple cats. It’s not uncommon for a cat to tolerate some cats, but not get along with others in the house. However, the more cats sharing the same territory, the more likely it is that some of your cats will begin fighting with each other.

When you introduce cats to each other, one of them may send “play” signals which can be misinterpreted by the other cat. If those signals are interpreted as aggression by one of the cats, then you should handle the situation as “aggressive.”

The factors that determine how well cats will get along together are not fully understood. Cats that are well-socialized (they had pleasant experiences with other cats during kittenhood) will likely be more sociable than those that haven’t been around many other cats. On the other hand, “street cats” that are in the habit of fighting with other cats in order to defend their territory and food resources, may not do well in a multi-cat household. Genetic factors also influence a cat’s temperament, so friendly parents are probably more likely to produce friendly offspring.

Copyright Denver Dumb Friends League and Humane Society of the United States. All rights reserved.

Copyright & Credit:
Source: Paws – www.paws.org

Photo copyright and courtesy: Juan Pablo Oitana – stock.xchng

House Soiling Problems: Marking & Inappropriate Toileting Behavior

| November 3, 2010
House Soiling Problems: Marking & Inappropriate Toileting Behavior

There are many reasons cats pee or poo in the wrong places. There may be a combination of different factors.

There are many reasons cats pee or poo in the wrong places. There may be a combination of different factors.

These include:

Medical
Incontinence/partial incontinence
Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disorders
Cystitis – causes frequent urgent urination and the cat may simply not make it to the tray
Senility
Reaction to medication (the hormone “Ovarid” has sometimes triggered house-soiling)

Litter Tray & Litter Type

  • Litter tray too close to food or bed
  • Litter tray shared with other cats
  • Litter type not acceptable – some cats dislike fullers earth litters, others dislike wood pellets etc
  • Litter tray is in an area which is too busy/frequently disturbed
  • Litter tray has been suddenly moved
  • Litter tray not clean or not clean enough

Behavioural (Scent Marking)
Stress – too many cats in a multicat household
Territorial – cat is trying to mark the area as its own to deter other cats
Insecurity/Invasion – a stranger has triggered marking behaviour (may be another cat or another human)
Scent – other scents in the area mimic cat odour and trigger marking behaviour; the cat tries to eradicate the offending scent with its own scent
Reaction to the urine/faeces scent from a nappy (diaper) – a cat’s sensitive nose may detect any slight leakage of odour.
Although most often associated with spraying (in both males and females), both urine and/or faeces may be deposited for marking.

Genetic/Upbringing
Some cats genetically lack what it takes to use a litter tray correctly; this has been found to be more common in Persians (UK studies)
The mother cat may not have used the litter tray and her behaviour has been copied
The cat was not previously provided with a litter tray and has learned to deposit its waste on the floor (seen in cats rescued from cat hoarders)

Useful Hints
Get the cat checked over by a vet. Several medical conditions can cause house-soiling: incontinence/partial incontinence, cystitis, reaction to medication. If there are other behaviour problems, such as aggression or destructive behaviour, it would be worthwhile contacting a pet behaviourist. Your vet may be able to provide a referral. If not, you will be able to find information on the web. Look for a behaviourist who is a member of a recognised association in your country.

If possible, exclude the cat from the soiled area. If the cat soils a particular rug or cushion, consider moving that item to an area the cat has no access to. Sometimes prevention is the only method. It may be possible to give the cat access to the prohibited area or to return the rug/cushion to its usual place once the cat consistently uses its tray and its association to the soiled place/item is broken. If so, the soiled item(s) must be thoroughly cleaned so that there is no residual smell to attract the cat.

Each cat should have its own litter tray and these should be well away from food, water or their beds/baskets. It may involve having litter trays away from each other as well.

Make the soiled area unattractive to the cat: obstruct it, cover it with crinkled foil or double-sided adhesive tape etc. Make it an unrewarding area to visit.

Clean and deodourise the soiled areas/items with non-chlorine bleach (e.g. a hypochlorite bleach such as Parazone, Domestos [UK tradenames]) or a non-bleach cleaner. Diluted white vinegar helps to remove the residual scent, or there may be proprietary odour removers in pet stores (depending on which country you live in). Many of the normal bleaches (and also any product containing ammonia) break down into components which smell a bit like cat pee (usually too faint for humans to detect) and this can drive a cat into a frenzy of scent marking; in addition, chlorine bleaches can cause some cats to “trip” much like catnip. Avoid phenol disinfectants (those which go cloudy when added to water) as these are toxic to cats.

Use strong smelling deterrent scents such as eucalyptus, citronella or citrus. If you use these, make sure the cat cannot lick or chew them. Mothballs used to be recommended for this purpose, but are toxic to cats. Though no longer advised, should you decide to use mothballs, these must be places such that the cat cannot get to them (e.g. crushed and the powder placed underneath the fitted carpet).

Place bowls of food (biscuits are best, these don’t spoil as fast as canned food) in the cleaned areas. Few cats will pee where they eat, although I have been unfortunate enough to have one of the exceptions to the rule. Do not use bowls of food and deterrent smells in combination!

If possible, consider putting the litter tray(s) in one or other of the areas chosen for house-soiling. If the cat uses the tray, over a period of days or weeks, shift the tray by an inch every few days to the owner’s preferred location. Do not shift it too far at a time as you will confuse the cat and may worsen the house-soiling.

Try several trays, each with different cat litters. If the cat was used to using outdoors, use sterilised garden soil (bake the soil in the oven in a metal roasting tray). Over time, mix conventional cat litter into the soil and reduce the amount of soil used. The cat is gradually familiarised with cat litter until the soil can be eliminated altogether. Follow a similar approach whenever you change from one litter type to another.

Check that the cat isn’t getting territorial due to other cats entering the house or due to other odours. If the behaviour was triggered by a new arrival (adult or infant or another animal) then the cat must be properly socialised with the newcomer so it isn’t seen as a threat or competitor. This can be done by scent-mixing.

Scent Mixing

  • Place a clean tea-towel in the newcomer’s bed for a few days to pick up the newcomer’s scent.
  • Wipe the cat down with the scented towel so that it picks up the cat’s scent and the two scents are mixed; you will need to do this two or three times.
  • Use the towel (still with mixed scents) in the cat’s bed.
  • If the newcomer is another cat, this needs to be a 2-way process with each cat scenting a towel and that towel being transferred to each other’s beds.

Note: Do not be tempted to put the scented towel straight into the cat’s bed – he will probably pee on it! The towel must have a mixture of both scents first.

Step-By-Step Litter Tray Rebonding Program

  • Confine the cat to a kitten pen (large cage) which contains his bed, food and water. The rest of the kitten pen floor must be covered in litter. The only place he can pee is in his bed or on the litter. Only allow him out after he has peed (if he still pees outside, it is marking behaviour which different altogether). During this time, deodourise the house and /clean articles he has peed on.
  • After about a week, instead of litter on the kitten cage floor, put it in a litter tray. If he has bonded to the litter, he will use the tray. If not – it’s back to step 1 for another week.
  • When he is consistently using the tray, confine him to a single, easily cleaned room with his bed, food/water and litter tray. If he reverts, it’s back to step 2.
  • Once he consistently uses the tray he can have more freedom.

Note: Avoid leaving around any triggers for bad toileting – newspapers etc – until he is absolutely reformed. There’s owner lifestyle modification needed too!

THREE CASES OF INAPPROPRIATE TOILETING

These are three of my own cats who have house-soiled at some point and the steps I have taken to resolve the problem. The first case is a case of the cat never having been litter-trained and simply not understanding the concept of house-training (believed to be a genetic problem). The other two cases were triggered by different factors; one being litter tray habit breakdown and the other was marking behaviour. Please note that these reports are from England where cats are most usually indoor/outdoor pets.

CASE 1: CAT UNABLE TO COMPREHEND LITTER TRAY USE

CAT’S NAME: APHRODITE (Affy)
BREED: Domestic Longhair thought to be of part-Persian ancestry

CAT’S BACKGROUND
Acquired as stray, aged 5 months approx, from area where there was known to be an unneutered Persian tomcat servicing local unspayed females and also a backstreet ‘breeder’ – whom I have met – producing Persians known to be ‘unhousetrainable’. ‘Persian type’ kittens often found stray in area; some had litter-bonding problems which were solved by having kittens fostered amongst litter-trained kittens! Affy’s litter tray problem was evident from the start. There was no physical problem although she did suffer from occasional blocked anal glands (anal gland episodes and soiling episodes do not appear to be linked).

TIME TO LITTER/HOUSE TRAIN
Affy did not recognise a litter-tray at all. This was very problematical as she was confined to house until settled in and spayed. Multiple trays with various alternative substrates were provided, but not used. Had preference for urinating/defecating on shoes or on doormat (presumably attracted to smells of outdoors), but even when area was thoroughly deodorized and such attractions removed, she used the floor (anywhere in hallway) rather than litter trays. In all other respects she was very eager to please us and seemed genuinely flummoxed by the concept of litter trays. Tried to ‘prime’ litter tray with her scent by placing solids in it – no luck.

Once allowed outdoors, problem diminished, but did not disappear. Initially blamed this on laziness, but it seemed that she genuinely did not recognise the household (den) as being somewhere to keep clean. Intermittently soiled previously soiled areas despite rigourous efforts to deodorize, deterrents and exclusion from these areas for several weeks at a time. Litter trays were removed from area once she had access outdoors – pointless leaving them down as she never used them. A long term barrier was placed to exclude her from the most often used area by the front door. Soiling behaviour only truly vanished when the entire hall carpet was replaced (after 18 months approx) and the areas under the soiled patches were thoroughly sterilized.

After approximately 3 years, she used a litter tray provided for an older cat who was not able to go outdoors. She watched the other cat use the litter tray and the penny dropped – but only for urine. From then on, she would sometimes use litter tray for urine, but preferred the middle of the front lawn for her excretory functions. We exhausted the whole array of available litter types AND garden soil. In order to maintain clean house we allowed 24 hr access to a garden (the rear garden is fenced in). Litter trays are only provided in inclement weather or if one of the other cats too doddery to go outdoors. We now consider her ‘clean’ as many cats have an occasional accident indoors.

METHODS USED/SUCCESS RATE
Many methods were used, often in combination, during the 18 months before we re-carpeted the hallway. Once Affy allowed outdoors, all solids were relocated from soiled area to a flowerbed to build up attachment to outdoor toilet.

Deodorize area – bleach, vinegar, proprietary pet-odour removers etc. No effect. Later also used strong scents to deter cat. No effect.
Multiple litter-trays/multiple substrates on/near preferred areas. Tray was regarded as an obstacle. No attempt to use tray.
Covered cleaned, soiled areas with ‘unattractive’ under-paw textures e.g. bin-bags, perspex sheet, foil. Cat continued to use area regardless of texture and/or scent. One notable failure resulted in a large puddle in the middle of a sheet of plastic and a set of soggy footprints leading away from it!
Put food on a thoroughly deodorized area that had previously been favoured for soiling. Astonishingly Affy would foul right next to the food and still munch her food with relish afterwards. Sometimes the urine/faeces even touched the edge of the foodbowl, but she was not deterred from either eating or from inappropriate soiling. This was supposed to be infallible!
After working out when soiling episodes normally occurred we lay in ambush with a water spray. Affy simply moved her activities elsewhere or rescheduled her toileting. NB: as a result she became desensitised to water-sprays and regarded it as a toy.
Luckily the incidence of soiling gradually decreased and Affy used the garden more frequently, but would still use the area close to the front door if she could gain access to it. A barrier was erected to prevent access to this area. Every time the barrier was removed, the problem flared up again despite use of above methods.

Finally: The hall carpet was ruined by repeated soiling, perfuming, shampooing etc. A new one was laid but the barrier at the front door was retained for a while to prevent access. Otherwise, no further soilings occurred, but rather than use a flower bed, Affy used the middle of the front lawn. Middening/marking behaviour was considered, but she showed covering behaviour so we presume she was raised in an area where there was no suitable substrate for digging. Raking/covering up behaviour was present, but ineffective on grass. We considered the problem solved to our satisfaction; as long as she had access to garden and was excluded from the doormat, she is housetrained.

After around 3 years, Affy observed another cat urinating in a litter-tray and copied its behaviour, but would never be fully bonded to a litter tray. There were occasional accidents (either Affy or one of the other cats) by front door, probably due to the outdoors scent (having no porch we cannot remove our shoes before entering house). When accidents occured we replace the barrier for a period of several weeks and thoroughly deodorize the area before removing the barrier. We can then go several months without problems.

Affy was very used to seeing other cats around as I take on old cats and have fostered kittens. The presence of other cats did not seem to affect her behaviour as she was a very tolerant, mellow animal. She was very eager to please and was most confused about the toilet problem as she genuinely seemed to have a blind spot in this respect.

At age of 10 years 11 months, Affy was confined following a “heart attack” (cardiomyopathy of acute onset). She used the litter tray consistently for liquids and solids. Unfortunately she had to be euthanized a week after the heart attack as the cardiomyopathy did not respond to treatment to regulate the heart or to prevent fluid accumulation.

CASE 2: TOILETING HABIT BREAKDOWN DUE TO MEDICATION

CAT’S NAME:
SAPPHO
TYPE: Domestic Longhair

PROBLEM/RESOLUTION:
Sappho showed inappropriate urination (on a particular rug) while she was on Ovarid tablets for skin problems (at age of 12). As soon as the Ovarid was withdrawn, the problem was resolved. As Sappho was a very fastidious cat who would only use the most secluded spots in the garden for her toilet, the Ovarid seemed to be the cause.

In later cases of skin problem, Ovarid was not used. Evening Primrose Oil was used instead and a daily dose was used to prevent skin problems from occurring at all. She also had Inflammatory Bowel Disorder. It appears that Ovarid triggered inappropriate urination though the reason was not clear (Marking behaviour? Poor continence? Bladder inflammation?)

At 16, Sappho become wholly senile and though continent, her toileting behaviour (anywhere, no attempt to locate litter tray or to use tray even if it was in front of her) became problematical for the household. She also had increasingly liquid bowel motions. The diarrhoea and toileting behaviour, combined with aggressive secondary tumours on the abdomen (2 mammary tumours had previously been removed) contributed to the decision to euthanize Sappho due to decreased quality of life.

CASE 3: URINE MARKING DUE TO INSECURITY/NEWCOMER SCENT
CAT’S NAME: CINDY
TYPE: Domestic Longhair

PROBLEM/RESOLUTION:

Cindy is a domestic longhair adopted from a shelter. Her previous owner had moved from a house to a flat (apartment). Cindy had previously had access to a garden. The owner’s new boyfriend did not want the cat and Cindy was often shut out of the flat, causing a nuisance on the staircase. She was relinquished to a shelter, with very detailed medical history and notes (i.e. her owner had cared greatly for her, but was unable to keep her). Cindy was very withdrawn and scared; most people were deterred when she hissed at them. When taken home, she tong a long time to gain confidence and was wary of my partner and other men. This was worsened when my partner hissed back at her. Cindy developed a strong bond with me.

Almost 2 years after adoption, Cindy began to urinate persistently on the shared double bed. The only solution was to exclude her from this room during the day when we were not there to supervise her. If the door was not firmly closed, or if we forgot to close it, she immediately soiled the bed. On two occasions, she soiled the bed while were in it, leading to her being excluded at night. She did not soil the bed when my partner was away from home on business, suggesting that his presence was a trigger factor.

Not long after, it transpired that my partner was having an affair. He moved out of the home. On a hunch, I allowed Cindy free access to the bedroom again. There have been no more soiling incidents. It is notable that Cindy is obsessive about cheek marking/flank marking doorways, furniture and even scent-marking Motley, my other cat. This indicates that she is basically an insecure personality who needs constant reassurance.

Note: The bedroom is usually the area of the house with the strongest owner scent. In feline terms this means it is “core territory” and prime target for urine/faeces marking problems as the cat tries to reinforce the association of its scent with its owner’s scent..

I concluded that Cindy, known to be nervous and insecure, was marking to remove the other woman’s scent (carried in on my partner’s clothing or skin) from the bed. She was doing this to reinforce her bond with me and to repel the intruder. Once the strange scent no longer appeared on the bed, there was no need to scent mark. When my current partner stays overnight, although she is nervous, she does not try to scent mark the bed , further indicating that she saw the “other woman” as an intruder (perhaps because she could not see the person whose scent it was).

I am not suggesting that another person’s cat’s marking behaviour is due to marital infidelity! However, a scent brought in from outside (colleagues, other animals) or a newcomer to the house (baby, new partner, lodger) may trigger marking behaviour in an insecure cat. It is important to socialise the cat with newcomers. Also, certain outdoor articles (shoes, coats etc) may pick up smells which attract marking behaviour – if so, do not leave these things lying around; shut them in a cupboard/closet or closed room!

Copyright & Credit:
Copyright 2009, Sarah Hartwell – MESSYBEAST.COM


How Do Cats Communicate?

| October 27, 2010
Cats can make a great number of noises and sounds; some scientists think they can produce up to 81 different sounds and pitches. All of these have different meanings. The amount of noise your cat makes depends on its personality; some cats don’t make any noise.

Cats can make a great number of noises and sounds; some scientists think they can produce up to 81 different sounds and pitches. All of these have different meanings.

Cats, tigers, panthers, leopards, lions and cheetahs all communicate in similar ways. When you own a cat it is very important to understand how it communicates. By reading this short article you will learn the basics of cat communication. You will learn how to tell what mood your cat is in and if anything, what it wants. Your cat will communicate differently with you than other cats and animals. They use a range of different ways to communicate including noises, body language etc. If you spend some time observing your cat, sometimes it can be easy to understand what type of mood they are in and other times it can be impossible. This section will give you the right information to understand your cat’s communication.

Noises and sounds

Cats can make a great number of noises and sounds; some scientists think they can produce up to 81 different sounds and pitches. All of these have different meanings. The amount of noise your cat makes depends on its personality; some cats don’t make any noise. The most common out of all the sounds that cats make is ‘meow’; it can mean that your cat is hungry, curious, angry, happy or welcoming you home. The second most common sound is purring, scientists don’t know much about it, most of the time it is a sign of happiness and content but on rare occasions it can mean your cat has a serious illness. Other sounds such as growling and hissing mean that your cat is angry, upset or scared.

Body language

Cats use a variety of body language, some examples are the movement of its tale, the position of its ears and even how it is standing. The most obvious body language your cat uses is the movement of its tale. In general, the higher your cat’s tale, the happier it is. When your cat is in an extremely happy mood it will point its tale directly up and when it is scared and afraid it will tuck it between its legs. When your cat is angry or annoyed it will throw its tale from side to side. Short quick movement’s and twitching indicates restlessness and excitement.

In conclusion, when a cat is happy or excited it raises its tale to a vertical angle and rubs against you and may possibly lick you when you put your hand out, an example of this is when you are about to feed it. On the other hand when your cat is angry it puffs up its hair, its eyes become big, it growls, flattens its ears and spits. When a cat is happy and content, it lies on its stomach with its paws tucked under its body. When your cat wants to play it lies on its side with its paws and feed outstretched.

Copyright & Credit:
Source: www.isnare.com
About the Author:If you liked what you read here, visit http://www.petguide-online.com for more information on all aspects of caring for your pet. The site consists of a huge range of detailed information on cats, dogs, birds and fish.

Photo copyright and courtesy: Matthias Wuertemberger– stock.xchng

How Many Cat Litter Boxes Do You Need

| January 25, 2014
How Many Cat Litter Boxes Do You Need

The number of cat litter boxes available for your kitties is another key to good litter box habits. Many cats are fussy about their litter boxes, and if they aren’t happy with number you provide, they communicate their unhappiness to you in most direct manner possible – they stop using the litter box.

The number of cat litter boxes available for your kitties is another key to good litter box habits. Many cats are fussy about their litter boxes, and if they aren’t happy with number you provide, they communicate their unhappiness to you in most direct manner possible – they stop using the litter box.

Here is some essential information for determining the minimum number of cat litter boxes you need for your cats.

First off, there is a tried and true formula that tells you the bare minimum number of cat litter boxes you should have available:

“X” cats + 1 = minimum number of cat litter boxes.

If you have three cats you need a minimum (I can’t stress this enough) of four cat litter boxes. However, depending upon your cat’s litter box habits, you may need more. Why?

Some cats require two litter boxes for their personal use. They use one for liquid waste deposit, and the other one for their solid waste output. If you have just two cats, and one of them fits this description, you’re already up to four cat litter boxes!

With this formula, even one cat requires at least two cat litter boxes. If you have a dwelling that is multi-story, you may need to strategically locate litter boxes on each level of your home. This works well to eliminate any problems your cat may have about making it to the litter box in time. Particularly as cats get older, they develop stiff joints and/or memory problems. You will see this illustrated in their ability to get to the cat litter box in time, provided they remember where the nearest one is located.

If you have several cats in your household, applying this formula can be challenging if you run out of litter box locations that suit you. What if your cats don’t like the litter box locations you chosen? They tell you – they do their waste elimination business in the location they’d prefer to see a cat litter box.

It may take some creativity on your part, as well as negotiation with the cats, to place the minimum number of cat litter boxes around your house that will reinforce good cat litter habits.

When I am contacted by cat owners who have 4 or more cats, and they want to know how boxes they need to have available, they sometimes gasp at my answer. But cleaning up after multiple cats can become a full time job. You really have to scoop out the boxes as often as the cats deposit their mess, because a dirty cat litter box will cause problems.

For this reason, I always urge feline owners who live in rather small spaces to think seriously about the number of cats they wish to keep, especially if they decide to keep all kitties indoors. I agree that all cats should be kept indoors, except under special circumstances. However, space considerations are finite and can only accomodate so many cats and their litter boxes.

The majority of questions I receive from stressed-out cat owners involve multi-animal households. Often, the owner simply doesn’t realize that each cat needs at least one litter box to call her own. When they realize the number of cat litter boxes necessary, they often have to be very creative to place the litter boxes in strategic locations.

However, once you set up enough cat litter boxes, depending upon your cat’s litter box habits, successful litter box habits can be learned and enforced.

Copyright & Credit:

Article Source: Source: www.isnare.com About the Author: Nancy has successfully eliminated cat urine odor from her home, and kept the kitty that caused it. The Cat Urine Odor Advisor helps you save money and stop the damage in your household by offering solutions that work together to eliminate cat urine odor from your home. http://www.cat-urine-odor-advisor.com Subscribe to the Cat Urine Odor Solutions newsletter, and I’ll send you my free report “Four Important Litter Box Basics For Your New Kitten.” Start your new addition to the family off right, and never have a cat urine odor problem! RSS feed http://quikonnex.com/channel/view/caturineodoradvisor

Photo copyright and courtesy: Rcoldbreath

How to Bond With Your New Cat

| December 14, 2013
How to Bond With Your New Cat

Your relationship with your cat depends on its individual temperament, its early socialization, and how you behave with it.

Contrary to their image, cats are social animals and can form successful attachments to human owners and other family pets. Your relationship with your cat depends on its individual temperament, its early socialization, and how you behave with it. Not all cats appreciate close physical contact which can be disappointing to an owner who wants a cuddly pet. Certain breeds, such as Siamese, tend to be more affectionate; others breeds, such as Abyssinians, are more independent. There are exceptions within each breed just like the exceptions in human classifications.

People, who don’t like cats, often maintain that cats tend to seek out affection only when they want to be fed. While it is true that cats are initially drawn to the person who gives them food, a close attachment to their owner is something that runs much deeper. Merely filling up the cat’s food bowl is not enough to foster this kind of intense emotional bond. A broad range of interaction is an important way for you and your cat to learn more about each other so you should play with, talk to, and respond to the cat in as wide a variety of situations as possible when you are first getting to know each other.

This does not mean to overwhelm the cat with attention. It is particularly important to avoid this in a rescued cat that has been neglected or abused, or is timid and nervous in temperament. Instead, make yourself generally available, and the cat will come to you in its own time when it feels comfortable and relaxed enough to do so.
Dealing with Aloofness

Under-attached cats may be perfectly happy, but their owners may feel rejected and upset. Typically, these cats will not settle on the owner’s lap and may run away if they think someone is about to pick them up. The most common cause of this behavior is lack of early socialization, but rough owners, traumatic experiences, and invasive handling during illness can also trigger the problem. To promote good socialization, all kittens should be handled gently on a regular basis, particularly between 2 and 7 weeks of age. If the problem already exists  increase your bond with your cat by rewarding any signs of approach and trying to make the cat more dependent. The cat must dictate the pace. Do not pick it up until it is confident and relaxed about being handled.

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Source: www.ArticlesFactory.com | Visit Apex Pet Supplies for your cat crate needs.  They, also, have pet rat cages to protect your other pets when introducing a new cat to the
home.

How to correct cats unwanted behaviour

| February 22, 2011
Scientists emphasize five types of the common problems, which you can meet during you cat upbringing and training.

Scientists emphasize five types of the common problems, which you can meet during you cat upbringing and training.

Domestic animal must know how to adapt itself to live with you together, from one side, preserving it’s originality, and from the other side – don’t be a burden or source of problems for your home. In order to keep this in balance you need to blockade cat’s bad behaviour. And the best thing you can do with this – is preventive measures.

Scientists emphasize five types of the common problems, which you can meet during you cat upbringing and training.

Cat behavioural problem No 1.

Capricious and aggressive cat, which does everything, it wants.

Sources of such behaviour come out from its childhood, when it didn’t know word: “NO!” or “DON’T!”

What to do with this? You need to take your kitten or adult cat to your hands more often. And never kick it! Because this will not help, only will make cat angrier. If cat shows its claws – stop playing and caressing it, and say: “NO!” or “DON’T!” You should remember, that cat’s belligerence very often caused by fear.

Sometimes you may meet spitting cats. You may respond to this cat’s bad behaviour the same way – spitting upon it! If this does not help, take sprayer – this method definitely helps.

Sometimes cats behave very aggressive, scratching your carpets, and it seems they are trying to bury something. It can come from feeling that cat lost control upon situation. In this case – you may propose old rug to your cat. Or wrap cat in warm towel. It works, because warmth reduces fear, as well as love and caress.

The second possible cause of such an aggressive behaviour – cat’s territory protection. It happens more often in places, where live more than one animal. In this case – you need to teach patiently your pets to get accustomed to one another. And in no way lock them up. In the worst case scenario – spray them, using the same perfumes.

Cat behavioural problem No 2.

“Silly” cats, that refuse using litter box, drag off things from the table.

In this case – the first thing is – to think about medical issues with your cat. If everything is fine and cat’s health in a good condition, think it over, whether your cat lives well in your house. Maybe cat, doing all of those things, just trying to catch your attention, because cat angry, lonely or unhappy! In this case the first measures it is love and care! Coming home after work – first thing you need to do is caress your cat and communicate with it! And only after that – socialize with the rest of your family!

Also cats don’t like people, who they are afraid of. And because of this – cats do mark in front of those people. In this case, I advise you to hang up the foil, where you wrapped the fish, over the cat’s favourite place, where cat does marks. This method will distract cat’s attention to do the marks on the floor. Or you may try to feed your cat in that place, where cat urinates.

If you can not find out about motives of such behaviour, glue the sticky tape around that “special” territory, or spray with vinegar around it. And you don’t need to poke your cat’s nose into that mess – it doesn’t work every time! Also consider to set up litter box very comfortable for your cat to use.

Cat behavioural problem No 3.

You have a “whining” cat.

Maybe, the first thing you will want to do is to take cat to your hands and caress it! And the second thing, which comes to your mind after few hours listening to the cat’s howling – is to kill your pet! Of course, if it is not the disease, you need to know – cat is whining, because it feels abandoned. What is the solution to this behavioural problem? You need to provide comfortable place for your cat, according its taste. Make such a place well beforehand cat’s “concert”, and if cat starts whining at night anyway – spray cat with water.

Cat behavioural problem No 4.

You have cat – destroyer.

Representatives of this type trying to tear everything that could be found on their way. In this case you must hold your temper and all your patience! Cat will not understand from the very first time that it is not allowed to tear to pieces everything in your house. You need to have special plank for cat to scratch. Any plants, which cat doesn’t like and always pull out you need to keep in a safe place, not reachable for the cat. It is better to make special garden for your pet only. The most elementary “cat’s garden” – is oats in the pot. You may grow wheat or parsley as well.

How to break of cat’s habit to jump on the furniture.

I may propose the easiest way: tables and chairs with trap, made of pile of books, or tin cans, which fall on the cat with the slightest touch to the forbidden furniture. And don’t worry – it will not make any harm to the cat. All cats have brilliant reaction, so cat will be in the other corner of the room even before that tin can touch the cat or the ground! Also you may place deodorant cans in some “hot spots”. All cats are afraid of being sprayed.

Mastication of wires.

It is deadly habit! You must spray wires with vinegar or get them covered with tobacco paste. But first, you need to investigate, what cat’s response is to those smells.

Cat behavioural problem No 5.

You have cat, who is “prima donna”.

Main symptoms – cat eats with you at the same time, but only the best pieces of meal, you have prepared for yourself! And cat allows you to care about it graciously. Saying that, your cat is a snob. What do you need to keep in mind? Most of the cats can change their diet during just a few days, of course, if you think that it is the best and only choice. Cats can even go without food for few days – nothing terrible will happen!

Measures for changing such a behaviour: don’t feed your cat from your plate; you need to camouflage new cat’s food to its favourite food, increasing the dose. You need to harden your heart, because that time cat will be looking at you with beseeching eyes! Feed your cat strictly by appointed hours. You may even ring the hand bell before feeding time and caress your pet as often as possible.

Copyright & Credit:

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com

About the Author: Tim Mcferline

Tim is professional and enthusiast in training cats and dogs. To learn more about how to train your cat successfully and correct its behaviour please visit Cats training programms where you will find vital resources and answers for many of your questions.

Photo copyright and courtesy: Leslie Watts – stock.xchng

How to correct cats unwanted behaviour

| December 20, 2011
How to correct cats unwanted behaviour

Domestic animal must know how to adapt itself to live with you together, from one side, preserving it’s originality, and from the other side – don’t be a burden or source of problems for your home. In order to keep this in balance you need to blockade cat’s bad behaviour. And the best thing you can do with this – is preventive measures.

Domestic animal must know how to adapt itself to live with you together, from one side, preserving it’s originality, and from the other side – don’t be a burden or source of problems for your home. In order to keep this in balance you need to blockade cat’s bad behaviour. And the best thing you can do with this – is preventive measures.

Scientists emphasize five types of the common problems, which you can meet during you cat upbringing and training.

Cat behavioural problem No 1.

Capricious and aggressive cat, which does everything, it wants.

Sources of such behaviour come out from its childhood, when it didn’t know word: “NO!” or “DON’T!”

What to do with this? You need to take your kitten or adult cat to your hands more often. And never kick it! Because this will not help, only will make cat angrier. If cat shows its claws – stop playing and caressing it, and say: “NO!” or “DON’T!” You should remember, that cat’s belligerence very often caused by fear.

Sometimes you may meet spitting cats. You may respond to this cat’s bad behaviour the same way – spitting upon it! If this does not help, take sprayer – this method definitely helps.

Sometimes cats behave very aggressive, scratching your carpets, and it seems they are trying to bury something. It can come from feeling that cat lost control upon situation. In this case – you may propose old rug to your cat. Or wrap cat in warm towel. It works, because warmth reduces fear, as well as love and caress.

The second possible cause of such an aggressive behaviour – cat’s territory protection. It happens more often in places, where live more than one animal. In this case – you need to teach patiently your pets to get accustomed to one another. And in no way lock them up. In the worst case scenario – spray them, using the same perfumes.

Cat behavioural problem No 2.

“Silly” cats, that refuse using litter box, drag off things from the table.

In this case – the first thing is – to think about medical issues with your cat. If everything is fine and cat’s health in a good condition, think it over, whether your cat lives well in your house. Maybe cat, doing all of those things, just trying to catch your attention, because cat angry, lonely or unhappy! In this case the first measures it is love and care! Coming home after work – first thing you need to do is caress your cat and communicate with it! And only after that – socialize with the rest of your family!

Also cats don’t like people, who they are afraid of. And because of this – cats do mark in front of those people. In this case, I advise you to hang up the foil, where you wrapped the fish, over the cat’s favourite place, where cat does marks. This method will distract cat’s attention to do the marks on the floor. Or you may try to feed your cat in that place, where cat urinates.

If you can not find out about motives of such behaviour, glue the sticky tape around that “special” territory, or spray with vinegar around it. And you don’t need to poke your cat’s nose into that mess – it doesn’t work every time! Also consider to set up litter box very comfortable for your cat to use.

Cat behavioural problem No 3.

You have a “whining” cat.

Maybe, the first thing you will want to do is to take cat to your hands and caress it! And the second thing, which comes to your mind after few hours listening to the cat’s howling – is to kill your pet! Of course, if it is not the disease, you need to know – cat is whining, because it feels abandoned. What is the solution to this behavioural problem? You need to provide comfortable place for your cat, according its taste. Make such a place well beforehand cat’s “concert”, and if cat starts whining at night anyway – spray cat with water.

Cat behavioural problem No 4.

You have cat – destroyer.

Representatives of this type trying to tear everything that could be found on their way. In this case you must hold your temper and all your patience! Cat will not understand from the very first time that it is not allowed to tear to pieces everything in your house. You need to have special plank for cat to scratch. Any plants, which cat doesn’t like and always pull out you need to keep in a safe place, not reachable for the cat. It is better to make special garden for your pet only. The most elementary “cat’s garden” – is oats in the pot. You may grow wheat or parsley as well.

How to break of cat’s habit to jump on the furniture.

I may propose the easiest way: tables and chairs with trap, made of pile of books, or tin cans, which fall on the cat with the slightest touch to the forbidden furniture. And don’t worry – it will not make any harm to the cat. All cats have brilliant reaction, so cat will be in the other corner of the room even before that tin can touch the cat or the ground! Also you may place deodorant cans in some “hot spots”. All cats are afraid of being sprayed.

Mastication of wires.

It is deadly habit! You must spray wires with vinegar or get them covered with tobacco paste. But first, you need to investigate, what cat’s response is to those smells.

Cat behavioural problem No 5.

You have cat, who is “prima donna”.

Main symptoms – cat eats with you at the same time, but only the best pieces of meal, you have prepared for yourself! And cat allows you to care about it graciously. Saying that, your cat is a snob. What do you need to keep in mind? Most of the cats can change their diet during just a few days, of course, if you think that it is the best and only choice. Cats can even go without food for few days – nothing terrible will happen!

Measures for changing such a behaviour: don’t feed your cat from your plate; you need to camouflage new cat’s food to its favourite food, increasing the dose. You need to harden your heart, because that time cat will be looking at you with beseeching eyes! Feed your cat strictly by appointed hours. You may even ring the hand bell before feeding time and caress your pet as often as possible.

Copyright & Credit:

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com

About the Author: Tim Mcferline

Tim is professional and enthusiast in training cats and dogs. To learn more about how to train your cat successfully and correct its behaviour please visit Cats training programms where you will find vital resources and answers for many of your questions.

Photo copyright and courtesy: Leslie Watts – stock.xchng

How to Make Your Dog Get Along With Your Cats

| February 22, 2011
While there are some breeds of dogs that do not naturally interact well with other pets most breeds of dogs can be socialized to interact appropriately with cats and live together in a house.

While there are some breeds of dogs that do not naturally interact well with other pets most breeds of dogs can be socialized to interact appropriately with cats and live together in a house.

There is a common misconception among some pet owners that dogs and cats cannot co-exist together within a house. While there are some breeds of dogs that do not naturally interact well with other pets most breeds of dogs can be socialized to interact appropriately with cats and live together in a house. The way that the two species are introduced to each other as well as the age of both the dog and cat are key. In addition the pets prior history with the other species really makes a difference as well.

Puppies and cats

If you are considering bringing home a new puppy and you currently have cats there are some steps that you can do to provide the best possible first meeting.

  • Keep the puppy separate from the cats for the first few days.
  • Allow the cats to smell the blankets that the puppy has slept on and vice versa.
  • Hold the puppy and allow the cats to smell him or her without the puppy being able to move towards the cats. This is best done if the puppy is held securely on the floor or on a lap.
  • Once they have had a chance to see each other when the puppy is under control consider allowing the puppy to walk around the room with the cats.
  • The cats should not be held; rather they should be allowed to move away from the puppy when they want.
  • If the puppy barks or attempts to chase the cats correct the puppy with a quick “No” and give them an appropriate toy to play with. Soon the puppy will realize that they are to chew on the toy, not try to chase the cats.
  • Supervise all interactions between the cat and puppy until you are confident that they are well socialized. This may take several weeks depending on the comfort level of the cat and the size of the puppy.

Remember the younger this process starts the easier it will be. Keep in mind that some breeds are naturally more aggressive, particularly terriers and other hunting breeds such as Akitas, Dobermans, Rottweilers and hound varieties. Some of the smaller and toy dogs are also not well suited to interacting with cats, so research the breed and talk to current owners and breeders before you choose.

Dogs and cats

If you are considering a mature dog from a rescue or private home be sure to ask if they get along with cats. Most mature dogs that have been properly socialized with cats will get along with all cats after an initial “get to know each other” period. Often this is relatively short, lasting only a couple of days. Some mature dogs do very will with cats in the house but will immediately chase the same cat if they are outside. Carefully monitoring the dog and cat for the first few days is key for both safety and security for the cat and dog.

If you are not sure if the dog is socialized with cats assume that they are not, especially for large breeds of dogs or hunting type dogs including terriers. Keep the dog and the cat separate and only try to introduce them if the dog is on a very short leash and you have another adult there to work with the cat.

Often mature dogs will not interact well with cats but may develop an attitude of ignoring the cat. This may be acceptable but does not mean that the dog may not become aggressive towards the cat under certain conditions. Consider crate training or keeping your dog in a kennel or separate room when you are not able to supervise to prevent any fighting between the two species.

Most breeds of dogs do well with cats, especially when they are introduced slowly and at a young age. Proper socialization with other species will make your dog more accepting of all sorts of animals and will minimize their aggression towards others.
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About The Author
Kelly Marshall is a popular contributor at www.ohmydogsupplies.com

– where you can find dog beds, dog steps, pet ramps, and more unique dog gear that you’ll never find at your local pet store.

www.ArticleCity.com

Photo copyright and courtesy: Lily Rosen – stock.xchng

How To Train Your Cat

| December 20, 2011
How To Train Your Cat

This article is written to help pet owners train their cats. All cats are different and training methods have varied results. It is highly advised that before training your cat you consult a veterinarian or a professional trainer.

This article is written to help pet owners train their cats. All cats are different and training methods have varied results. It is highly advised that before training your cat you consult a veterinarian or a professional trainer.

The first thing many trainers say about cats is they’re not as smart as dogs.

It’s generally recognized that dogs have a better understanding of cause and effect than cats. Because of this, dogs can be trained to do a wide variety of tricks and tasks that cats cannot do. Certainly there are trainable felines but for the most part cats leave the tricks to the dogs.

The main thing most people want to train their cat to do is use the little box—everything after that is a bonus. The next two things are stopping cats from scratching the furniture and keeping them off counter tops. Fortunately, most house cats can be easily trained to do those things.

The most important thing to know about training cats is they don’t respond well to reprimands.

Your average kitty doesn’t really understand the concept of punishment. If you rub your cat’s nose in an “accident” he doesn’t realize that he’s not supposed to release on your brand new carpet. Instead, the cat starts to feel pain and fear every time you grab him by the back of the neck—that’s not good.

Ultimately, the best way to train your cat is through rewards. Offer a food treat to reinforce the behavior you want from them for example.

The other thing to keep in mind about cats is they become unruly when bored. The more inactive a cat the more likely they will become destructive. Every day set aside 20 to 30 minutes to play with your cat. This attention will keep your cat happy and healthy as well as easier to train.

Before training a cat to use the litter box, you’ll want to rule out a health problem like a urinary tract infection. In most cases what’s keeping your cat from using the litter box is a medical condition not an intense desire to defecate on your area rug. A cat that endures painful bowel movements will associate that pain with the litter box and avoid it.

A cat will also skip the little box if it’s full. You need to clean your cat’s box on a daily basis and regularly swap out their litter (they like about an inch and a half). On occasion you’ll want to rinse their box with water and to neutralize the smell of cat urine use lemon juice or vinegar.

In most cases, addressing your cat’s health problems and/or cleaning their litter box is all it takes. But if that doesn’t work, or if you’re dealing with a kitten, it’s quite easy to train your cat to use the litter box.

First, try to feed your cat at the same time every day. Cats have a digestive system that your Uncle Mort would kill for. Healthy cats are extremely regular. After a while, you’ll be able to use your cat’s bowel movements to set your watch.

About 15 minutes before your cat has to go take her into the room where her litter box is kept. Try to make the experience as pleasurable as possible. You can play with her for a few minutes and maybe even scratch the litter a few times to get her interested in the box (only if it’s clean of course).

Since she has nowhere else to go she will more than likely go in the litter box. When she does praise her and give her lots of love. You may even reward your cat with her favorite treat.

If your cat doesn’t go in the litter box don’t get discourage just try again. Patience is important when training a pet.

After a while your cat will realize that using the litter box is a pleasurable experience and will begin to use it without your cajoling.

Never allow a cat that doesn’t use the litter box to roam free in your house. If you need to leave a cat like this for extended periods of time keep her in a room (preferably one with a non-porous floor) with a clean litter box as well as fresh food and water.

Just remember that the best way to train your cat to use the litter box is to keep it clean, accessible, and make the entire experience as pleasurable as possible.

There are two ways to keep your cat from scratching your furniture and from getting up on your counter tops. Both ways involve making the behavior as uncomfortable as possible for your cat.

The first way to deter unwanted behavior is to squirt your cat with a water bottle or make a loud noise. Cats generally dislike getting wet and they especially despise loud obnoxious noises like pennies in a can, clapping, or a loud whistle.

Keep in mind that some cats have long coats and water won’t bother them very much. Not to mention that some cats even like getting sprayed with water (such as every cat I’ve ever owned). If that’s the case canned air is good alternative.

You will want to be sneaky when squirting and making loud noises. You want the cat to associate the water, or the noise, with their bad behavior and not you. This also ensures that the cat will stop the negative behavior all the time and not just when you’re around.

If you can’t hover over your cat all day you can apply certain materials and sprays to your furniture and counter tops that will keep them away.

For instance, double sided tape, tinfoil, plastic rubber spikes (the kind especially made for cats) and fragrant citrus fruits generally keep cats off surfaces. Cats don’t like the smell of citrus as the fruits’ acid makes them sick. There are also special sprays you can buy at pet stores or at your veterinarian’s office that will do the same thing.

Netting works well to protect furniture. Cats don’t like getting their claws caught in the material.

Make sure to provide an accessible scratching post. Contrary to what you may think cats don’t scratch your furniture to annoy you. They scratch to keep their claws sharp and their muscle firm. So giving them a safe place to scratch is vital for their health and happiness.

If you find your cat still prefers your limited addition Pottery Barn davenport try adding some cat nip to their scratching post.

Furthermore, keep your cat’s food and water away from all banned surfaces. The farther their food is from counter tops the more likely they are to stay off of them. It goes without saying but never feed your cat on a surface you wish for it to avoid.

With patience and love you can train your cat to use the litter box, refrain from scratching furniture and jumping onto counter tops. Just remember to use rewards not punishments to reinforce behavior. Cats don’t respond well to reprimands.

In no time you’ll have a healthy and happy trained cat. And once that goal is achieved, your cat can start training you.

Before training your cat you should consult a veterinarian or a professional trainer.

Copyright & Credit:

Article Source: By Susan Miller, Copyright 2009 We are Siamese cat lovers. We know a little about cats, and especially Siamese cats, mainly from simply having them all our lives. We also like to compile helpful information for others that we’ll post here at Siamese Cat World – www.siamesecatworld.com

Photo copyright and courtesy: Red~Star


Incontinence in Cats – 6 Reasons Your Cat May Not Be Able To Control Urination

| December 16, 2011
Incontinence in Cats-6 Reasons Your Cat May Not Be Able To Control Urination

If your well-trained cat has suddenly started to eliminate inappropriately, this may be a sign of a physical illness. Here are 6 conditions that may cause the onset of feline incontinence.

If your well-trained cat has suddenly started to eliminate inappropriately, this may be a sign of a physical illness. Here are 6 conditions that may cause the onset of feline incontinence.

Urinary Tract Infection
This type of infection is probably the most common reason for feline incontinence. Poor diet, lack of a clean environment, stress, and age can all contribute to this condition. It causes bladder spasms and creates a feeling of constant urgency to urinate. The good news is that catching this condition in its early stages means that antibiotics can usually affect a cure.

Diabetes
Studies show that this condition is occurring at alarmingly more frequent numbers. When this happens it causes water intake to sky rocket which means the need to urinate increases. Many times your pet is unable to make it to the litter box in time to prevent a mistake.

Kidney Stones
This condition is often first noticed when there is blood in the urine. As stones grow in size they sometimes block the urethra making it difficult if not impossible to pass urine. Other times they may allow only small amounts of urine to flow at unexpected times—a dribble if you will. The blood happens because as they more around they scratch the lining of the bladder causing blood to be passed with the urine.

Tumors
Growths inside the bladder take up room where urine is usually stored. As space grows more limited it becomes difficult for urine to pass out of the body. This may present as straining or pain for your pet when trying to urinate.

Old Age
Age can play out in many different ways for all creatures. Unfortunately, cats are not different. Forgetting where the litter box is, or being unable to figure out what to do once the urge to urinate happens are frequent results of feline behavior as they enter they senior years.

If this is a pet that has grown old in your care, you are probably well aware of its habits and signals for needing to go. Take it to the litter box at the usual times to try to ward off mistakes. Remember, they are very clean animals and don’t like soiling themselves even less than you do.

Decreased Muscle Tone
As age increases, muscle tone generally decreases. And this is no different for the muscles that control bladder function. Unintentional urination happens and your cat has absolutely zero control over when and where because the muscles are no longer cooperating. Very little can be done about this accept to have your cat wear a diaper, if it will tolerate one.

Even though incontinence can be frustrating for you, remember it is probably even more frustrating for your feline friend. Immediate medical attention for any of these conditions and emotional support from you will make you a hero in your cat’s eyes.

Copyright & Credit:

Article Source: Source: http://www.submityourarticle.com
Your cat’s incontinence doesn’t mean your home has to smell of urine odor. Remove urine odor for good with the air purifier at http://purerair.com/austin_air_pet_machine.html

Photo copyright and courtesy: George Bosela – stock.xchng

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