banner ad
banner ad
banner ad

RSSFeline Articles

Alarm Clock Kitty, How to Stop Early Morning Meowing

| April 2, 2012
Grudgingly, I drag myself out of my warm bed and look at the clock; 3:47 am. I reach over to the night-stand and turn on the light, pain is the result, the light, so bright, the light is, so, so bright. My wife rolls over on her side and I can see the annoyed look on her scrunched up little face

Grudgingly, I drag myself out of my warm bed and look at the clock; 3:47 am. I reach over to the night-stand and turn on the light, pain is the result, the light, so bright, the light is, so, so bright. My wife rolls over on her side and I can see the annoyed look on her scrunched up little face

Meow! Meow! Meow! I bury my head underneath my pillow. Meow! Meow! Meoooooow! The high pitched meowing persists and penetrates through my feather stuffed shield. Meow! Meow! Meow! My eyes open only with the greatest of efforts. Grudgingly, I drag myself out of my warm bed and look at the clock; 3:47 am. I reach over to the night-stand and turn on the light, pain is the result, the light, so bright, the light is, so, so bright. My wife rolls over on her side and I can see the annoyed look on her scrunched up little face. “Must…. feed…. demon… cat….” I say to myself as I trudge to the kitchen to empty a can of cat food into the little yellow cat dish. The cat has by this time woken up the entire household and I wouldn’t be surprised if the neighbors were also awake.

Our cat is a loud cat. Unnervingly loud. 747 jet-engine loud. And there was a time that she woke up every morning before even the sun had the nerve to peek over the horizon. Our loveable little ball of fur wanted to be fed. While the rest of the household was fast asleep our sweet little kitty wanted to have some food to suck down her gullet. This caused quite a bit of frustration for us, especially since this was not a one time thing. No, this was indeed becoming her morning ritual. Every morning, our cat would sit in front of our door and meow at the top of her little kitty lungs the most blood curdling meows I had ever had the displeasure of hearing. Our initial reaction, after caving in and feeding her several nights/early mornings in a row, was to put her in the laundry room before my wife and I went to sleep at night. This, however, was not the best solution in the world, our cuddly little black mass didn’t seem to like it very much and after a while she wasn’t the warm and cuddly cat we knew before.

There must to be another solution to this dilemma. Fortunately, there is. What your cat is, is what has been termed as an “alarm clock kitty”, what that is, is a cat that wakes up very early (or stays up very late) and begins to meow at approximately the same time every single, bloody day in expectation of being fed. Unfortunately for those of us who enjoy sleeping at night this is a natural behavior in cats and while the problem may not happen to every cat owner it happens to many. So what can you do? Even though cats have been domesticated animals for thousands of years now dating back to ancient Egypt, they still have retained most of their wild instincts and this is a cat’s natural instinct; hunt and feed. Cats are predatory animals, they hunt, and the cat’s natural time to hunt generally falls between dusk and dawn because most of the prey they hunt are nocturnal (rats, mice and other rodents). So, if you can’t or don’t want to let your cat out at night to hunt on her own what should you do?

Training your cat to stop this behaviour may be fairly easy, but be warned, it will take a little patience on your part but a good night’s sleep may be the reward. What you need is a cat toy, preferably a mouse or something similar, a piece of string and a stick. Attach the cat toy to a string and the string to the stick. While you are watching your bedtime TV or doing whatever your before bedtime ritual is take your cat toy and play a hunting game with her. Cats love to chase things because of their hunting instinct. Play with your cat for about 15 minutes, enough time to tire your cat out and give her the satisfaction of having hunted. During your game create as realistic a hunting scenario as you can, make noises like a mouse (or whatever animal you are emulating) squeaking or scurrying through the brush. Let your cat catch the toy from time to time so that your cat will feel as if she was involved in a successful (rather than a frustrating) hunt. Towards the end gradually slow down the game drawing your little hunt to a close. Your cat will probably be sufficiently tired by this time. At the end of the game feed your cat something you know she likes. You don’t need to feed her a full sized meal, but feed her an amount sufficient enough to satisfy her hunger. A handful of cat treats or a little piece of left over pork chop may be sufficient. Then go to sleep. In all likelihood your cat will be satisfied and will not continue her ritual of waking you up every morning.

You may need to continue your hunting game with your cat for a week or two before the early morning meowing goes away, and even after it does its a good idea to play this game with your cat from time to time in order to keep the behavior from returning and to keep your cat feeling like an accomplished hunter. But if you follow this routine you should be able to satisfy your cat and get a little shut eye at the same time.

Copyright & Credit:

Andy Markison is an illustrator, graphic designer, animal lover and pet owner living in Germany. His website, ZapGraphix.com, sells fun and humorous pet related merchandise.
Article Source: EzineArticles.com

Photo copyright and courtesy: Red~Star

All About Cats

| December 20, 2011
All About Cats

Cats are the members of the Felidae family of canivorous mammals. Lion, tiger, leopard, jaguar, African wild cat are the members of the cat family. Their closest relatives are civets, hyenas and mongooses. However, what we generally recognize as cat is the domestic or the house cat.

Cats are the members of the Felidae family of canivorous mammals. Lion, tiger, leopard, jaguar, African wild cat are the members of the cat family. Their closest relatives are civets, hyenas and mongooses. However, what we generally recognize as cat is the domestic or the house cat.

The association between cats and humans dates back to between 7000 to 4000 years ago. From being dragged into satanic ritual beliefs, Halloween and unlucky black cat tags to being cute, caring and loyal companions, cats have seen it all. Cats have also been associated with bad omens, death and witchcraft. On the other hand there have been cultures like Vikings who worshipped the Goddess Freya, the goddess of fertility, who was closely associated to cats.

Cat appears in the Vietnamese and Chinese Zodiac systems. They are highly respected in Islam since it is believed that Prophet Mohammed approved domestication of cat. Feeding a cat is regarded as a great deed in Islam. Ancient Egyptians hailed cats as embodiment of their Goddess Bast. In many of the pyramids, mummified cats were found in the thousands. This signifies the importance of cat for the ancient Egyptians.

Today, there are dozens of breeds of cat that are domesticated. As for your cat vocabulary, a group of cat is clowder, male cat is tom, female cat is queen and the cute little baby cat is called kitten.

An average cat weighs between 2.5 to 7 kgs. And live for 15 to 20 years. However, you can ensure a longer life for your pet cat by getting it spayed or neutered and getting all the necessary vaccinations done.

Cats are extremely intelligent. They communicate effectively through purring, hissing and gestures. Thanks to the 32 muscles in their ear, they have a sharp sense of hearing. Cats can conserve their energy by sleeping for long durations. Cats mostly land on their feet. They have a very good sense of balance and have great flexibility. They use their tail to regulate the angular momentum during their flight in a fall. They walk on their toes. They can also manipulate their walk in such a way that they make minimum sound and leave negligible tracks.

Cats have very superior eyesight and senses which are matched by no other animal. They have very good nocturnal eyesight. They have a field of view of 200 degrees. Their whiskers assist them in navigation. Surprisingly cats cannot taste sugary food because they have faulty sweet receptors.

Cats are fussy eaters. They are known to eat grass, leaves, shrubs and houseplants but they’ll eat only the specific food which they get used to. Whatever they are, they are some of the most popular pet around the world. So much so that they outnumber dogs as pets in USA.

Article Source:  http://www.articlecity.com  About The Author: Vremde Kattan is the delegate and administrator of which is a premier resource for information on cats. For questions or comments, go to: http://www.strangecats.com strange cats, inc. which is a premier resource for information on cats.  –

Photo copyright and courtesy: C & D Photo

Allergic to Cats? – 7 Helpful Answers For Those With Cat Allergies

| December 27, 2011
Allergic to Cats? - 7 Helpful Answers For Those With Cat Allergies

There's no news harder to hear than that you're allergic to your beloved cat. Here are 7 answers to questions that may mean the difference between finding another home for your cat or living happily ever after with your cat.

 

There’s no news harder to hear than that you’re allergic to your beloved cat. Here are 7 answers to questions that may mean the difference between finding another home for your cat or living happily ever after with your cat.

1.What is it about cats that cause allergies to flare? Contrary to popular belief that it’s the hair, the culprit is the protein (Fel d1) found in cat dander, saliva, and urine. No one knows why, but if you have sensitivity to this protein being exposed to can trigger reactions that range from irritating to debilitating.

2. Can cat hair trigger an allergy flare-up? The hair does not contain the protein, so in a word no. But it can seem that way because dander (which does contain the offending protein) often stick to the air and other airborne particles. And so contact with the hair that has dander on it can make it appear that the hair is the culprit.

3. Can bathing the cat reduce dander? Yes, scheduling a regular schedule for baths with a veterinarian recommended shampoo can reduce the amount that potentially go airborne and be inhaled. Be prepared for your cat’s disapproval, but hopefully with a regular schedule it will be come a routine that you both can literally live with.

4. Does Color Matter? There was a small study conducted several years ago whose findings indicated that dark-colored felines produced more dander than those with lighter fur. Without other studies to support it, this theory is inconclusive.

5. Does Sex Matter? Male cats are known to produce more allergy triggers than female. So if you have been identified as having allergies, this is an important piece of information to have as you adopt or add to the family.

6. Is there a way to stop the production of dander? These small flakes of dead skin that we call dander are a natural part of your cat’s growth and development. This is the body’s way of making way for newer healthier skin that will be more able to ward off disease and infection. This is a process that will continue for as long as you have your kitty.

7. Is there an effective way to manage the allergy symptoms well enough to be able to enjoy a cat? No one thing will work, but using a multi-pronged approach will greatly improve your quality.

Make one room a clean room that is off limits for your pet. Anticipate flare-ups by using over the counter medication or prescriptions from your allergist.

You should also use a HEPA or high efficiency particle arresting air cleaner to constantly reduce the allergens in the air. 24 hour filtration with this type of technology is by far the most effective and non-invasive way to deal with your allergies.

Copyright & Credit:

Article Source: Source: http://www.submityourarticle.com
Remove cat dander from your air continuously with the Cat Dander Air Purifier from PurerAir.com at http://purerair.com/cat_dander_air_purifier.html

Photo copyright and courtesy: Fofurasfelinas

Allergies to Pets

| December 26, 2011
Allergies to Pets

Studies show that approximately 15% of the population is allergic to dogs or cats. An estimated one-third of Americans who are allergic to cats (about two million people) live with at least one cat in their household anyway.

 

Being a pet owner is never easy. While pets bring us joy and companionship on a daily basis, they also require training, veterinary care, time, love, attention, and even tolerance. Tolerance is especially necessary when a pet owner is allergic to his or her companion animal.

Studies show that approximately 15% of the population is allergic to dogs or cats. An estimated one-third of Americans who are allergic to cats (about two million people) live with at least one cat in their household anyway. In a study of 341 adults who were allergic to cats or dogs and had been advised by their physicians to give up their pets, only one out of five did. What’s more, 122 of them obtained another pet after a previous one had died. It’s clear the benefits of pet companionship outweigh the drawbacks of pet allergies for many owners. Living comfortably with a companion animal despite being allergic to him requires a good understanding of the allergic condition and an adherence to a few rules.

All cats and dogs are allergenic (allergy-causing) to people who are allergic to animals. Cats tend to be more allergenic than dogs for allergic people, although some people are more sensitive to dogs than cats. Contrary to popular belief, there are no “non-allergenic” breeds of dogs or cats; even hairless breeds may be highly allergenic.

Dogs with soft, constantly-growing hair—the Poodle or the Bichon Frise, for example—may be less irritating to some individuals, although this may be because they are bathed and groomed more frequently. One dog or cat of a particular breed may be more irritating to an individual allergy sufferer than another animal of that same breed.

The source of irritation to pet-allergic humans? Glands in the animal’s skin secrete tiny allergy-triggering proteins, called allergens, that linger in the animal’s fur but also float easily in the air. Allergens are present in the animal’s saliva and urine, too, and may become airborne when saliva dries on the fur. The severity of reaction to these allergens varies from one person to the next, ranging from mild sniffling and sneezing to life-threatening asthma, and can be complicated by simultaneous allergies to other irritants in the environment.

If your or a family member’s allergies are simply miserable, but not life-threatening, take these steps to reduce the symptoms:

  • Create an “allergy free” zone in the home—preferably the bedroom—and strictly prohibit the pet’s access to it. Use a high-efficiency HEPA air cleaner (available at almost any home and garden store or discount department store) in the bedroom. Consider using impermeable covers for the mattress and pillows because allergen particles brought into the room on clothes and other objects can accumulate in them.

  • Use HEPA air cleaners throughout the rest of the home, and avoid dust-and-dander-catching furnishings such as cloth curtains and blinds and carpeted floors. Clean frequently and thoroughly to remove dust and dander, washing articles such as couch covers and pillows, curtains, and pet beds. Use a “microfilter” bag in the vacuum cleaner to effectively catch all the allergens.

  • Bathing your pet on a weekly basis can reduce the level of allergens on fur by as much as 84%. Although products are available that claim to reduce pet allergens when sprayed on the animal’s fur, studies show they are less effective than a weekly bath. Even cats can become accustomed to being bathed; check with your veterinarian’s staff or a good book on pet care for directions about how to do this properly, and use whatever shampoo your veterinarian recommends.

  • Don’t be quick to blame the family pet for allergies. Ask your allergist to specifically test for allergies to pet dander, rather than making an assumption. And understand that allergies are cumulative. Many allergy sufferers are sensitive to more than one allergen. So if you’re allergic to dust, insecticides, pollen, cigarette smoke, and cat dander, you’ll need to reduce the overall allergen level in your environment by concentrating on all of the causes, not just the pet allergy. For example, you may need to step up measures to remove cat dander from your home and carefully avoid cigarette smoke during spring, when it is difficult to avoid exposure to pollen.

  • Immunotherapy (allergy shots) can improve symptoms but cannot eliminate them entirely. They work by gradually desensitizing a person’s immune system to the pet allergens. Allergy-causing proteins are injected under the person’s skin, triggering the body to produce antibodies (protective proteins) which block the pet allergen from causing a reaction. Patients are usually given one dose per week for a few weeks to months (depending on the severity of the allergy) and then can often manage with one injection per month.

  • Additional treatments for allergies to pets are symptomatic, including steroidal and antihistamine nose sprays and antihistamine pills. For asthma, there are multiple medications, sprays, and inhalers available. It is important to find an allergist who understands your commitment to living with your pet. A combination of approaches—medical control of symptoms, good housecleaning methods, and immunotherapy—is most likely to succeed in allowing an allergic person to live with pets.

Of course, if you do not currently have a pet and are considering one, and know you are pet-allergic, be sure to consider carefully whether you can live with the allergy before you bring a new pet home. Except in the case of children, who sometimes outgrow allergies, few allergy sufferers become accustomed to pets to whom they are allergic. Too many allergic owners obtain pets without thinking through the difficulties of living with them. And too often, they end up relinquishing pets, a decision that is difficult for the owner and can be life-threatening for the pet.

Copyright & Credit:
Source: Paws – www.paws.org

Photo copyright and courtesy: Andreas-photography

Are You Experiencing A Hard Time Training Your Cat?

| December 27, 2011
Are You Experiencing A Hard Time Training Your Cat

Successful cat training involves a lot of time playing with your cat.

 

This article  shows how important it is to play with your cat  while in the training process. It highlights  the circus act of one Mr. Dominique LeFort, a Key West, Fl. entertainer who has gained a national reputation for his ability to train normal household cats to become outstanding performers.

If you are experiencing a tough time training your cat then read the following very carefully . Successful cat training involves a lot of time playing with your cat. The playing should be gentle and regular as it helps with bonding and loving each other.  Most cat training e-books tell you that the food reward or treat is an important factor, but so is the love and trust factor. The cat has to want to please you.

The very best example I have ever seen of domestic cat training was at a sunset celebration in Key West. The celebration is of tourists enjoying various entertainment acts put on by the locals.  It was a drop some money in the hat if the performance pleased you.  There w as a man by the name of Dominique Le Fort catmankeywest.com who had beautiful long hair, white cats.The cats each had a carrier for when they weren’t doing their thing.  When they were performing, they each had a simple bar stool that they sat on.  Unfazed by the crowd and all the noise, they would leap from stool to stool, through hoops and do all kinds of other neat tricks. It was truly incredible to watch.  He had to have spent many hours, days and months in training them. The cats were a delight for the big crowd.  Mr. LeForte and his cats are still performing at the Hilton Pier in Key West.

Most of us will be happy if we can get our cat to respond quickly, to our summons or when we tell them no.  First they must learn  their name so use it often.  They must also learn your language, both verbal and  physical body.  For each thing you try to teach  them, use a food treat/reward.   Give them lots of praise when they do  what you want correctly.  Do things in brief segments  because their attention span is short, if they aren’t in the stalking mode.  Make sure that what you are  trying to get your cat to do, is safe for the cat’s well being, or you will  ruin the trust factor.

Playing with your cat is  relaxing and can be accomplished in a couple of minutes here and there.  A TV commercial is an excellent time.  Make sure that the toys are safe.  Each cat seems to like different items to play with.   Our two cats have been rescued and they have very different requirements for what will get them to play.  They may  not want to play with a toy after awhile and then you must find something new.  We have one cat who could be on a soccer team, she loves to play with a soft kids ball, but she wants to hide behind a curtain and bat the ball out to you.  Our  latest rescued cat loves bottle caps [food safe] which he directs under the pantry door.  Then he opens up the door and bats it back out.  He also likes us to use the back scratcher to gently scratch his back and tickel his tummy.  They have both become experts at opening our pocket doors, when they want out of a room.  Trial and patience’s will help you discover what your cat likes and enjoys.

A vigorous  play time before your bedtime can help to ensure a good nights sleep.  The more jumping and running the better you will sleep.   If your cat is tired and well fed at night it will more likely sleep through the night.  Remember that a bored cat is a mischievous cat .  It will find something to do. Playing with your cat, gives it a good outlet for it’s mental and physical needs and also helps to keep it healthy, because it is exercising. Don’t just toss it a toy and ignore it.  A cat needs some show of love and attention.  It will also relieve your stress and gives you some exercise.

Please use a lot of common sense in choosing your cat’s  play things.  They must be safe. A good guide is would they be safe for a kid under three years of age .  Stuffed toys should be machine washable and be very careful about what they are  filled with.  No nut shells or polystyrene beads. Cat nip is a mind altering drug.  YarnHealth Fitness Articles, ribbons and strings can be chewed and ingested.  Put them away when play time is finished. Vets are  very expensive these days and you don’t want to harm your cat.  Be safe not sorry!

 


Copyright & Credit:
 

Source: Free Articles  |  Author: Judy Jantzen – My husband and I have owned cats for the past 25 years. Currently have a orange tabby and a black short hair. All the cats we have owned have been strays. For some of the finest cat goodies available anywhere including cat collars, cat carriers, fur ball remedies, return address labels and cat training e-books  check out our web site Cat Goodies Finder.com

Photo copyright and courtesy: Gatoteria

Are You Getting Ready To Travel With Your Cat?

| October 5, 2010
Are You Getting Ready To Travel With Your Cat?

Are You Getting Ready To Travel With Your Cat?

Traveling with your cat is sometimes your choice and sometimes a necessity. Lots of decisions and thinking can make it a safe and non freak out event. Cats like a stable and same old routine type of life. When you have to go away, then you have to decide what is best suited to your cats well being. What is easy for you, is not necessarily what is best for your cat.

Have a secure cat carrier, soft or hard. Soft is nice because it offers some give and is easy to hold in your arms, when your cat is frightened. It works very nicely in car travel. Hard is good for commercial travel, because it protects your cat from bumps and rough handling.

With either cat carrier take an old T-shirt that you have worn, that has your bodys scent on it and put it in the carrier. A favorite small blanket or something that will fit in the carrier, is also a good idea. It will help to calm the cat.

Remember that while you know what is going on, your cat is surrounded by new noises, scents, and people it does not know. It will also sense your nervousness of getting there on time and checking in.

Take your cat in for a check up with the vet. Make sure all shots are up to date and that you carry the paper work to prove it, in case there is a problem while traveling.

Make sure your city/ county registrations are up to date. That the harness or collar has them attached. A tag with your name, address and phone number is a good idea, in case the cat should get loose. Marker pen this information and your destination information inside the cat carrier.  Take along small plastic bowls/tubs. Recycled little sour cream containers work nicely.

Your cat probably will not eat or drink until you get to your destination, but you should be prepared in case you run into unexpected problems such as flight delays or car problems. Take along a back up supply of dry food in a ziplock bag and a small bottle of water. With flights you can dump the water out before going through clearance and refill it on the other side at a water fountain.

One very important thing to have on hand is those great wipe its, just put some in a ziplock bag. Do the same thing with a few paper towels and then you can deal with most messes. that can occur.

It is a good idea not to feed your cat for several hours before leaving home, because this helps the nevervous cat, not to throw up. Please remember that cats can develop serious medical problems, if they are forced to go too long without water or food.

Be sure to check with your host or hotel before hand to make sure your cat is welcome. When you arrive at your destination, secure the cat in your room and let it get use to the new space on its on terms. Leave the carrier open and available for its sense of security. Give it water and food right away. Put its litter box in place and put the cat in it, so that it knows it is available. It will probably hop right out, but it will know where it is. Spend at least a few minutes in your room, so that you get your scent on things to make things more familiar.

When traveling by car, it is a good idea to find a spot for the litter box and the cat to have easy access to it. Especially, if you are going to be driving for long hours. We cover our back seat with plastic garbage bags and then cover that with an old sheet. We put the litter box on top and the carrier next to it. It is seldom used, but when it is needed it is there. We carry a scooper and recyled grocery bags for a quick clean up. The scoopable/ lumping type litter works nicely. Be sure to pack some extra for freshness, on your return trip. A can of room fresher spray is also a good idea for the car and your room.

Be sure to secure the carrier between something, so that it does not roll over during curves or sudden stops. Proper preparation before a trip can make all the difference between a pleasant trip and one that you would just as soon forget about. Remember – if your cat travels with you, you know it is safe and well cared for.

About the Author: Judy Jantzen – my husband and I have owned cats for the past 25 years. Currently have two short hairs – an orange tabby and a black cat. Brought to you by Cat Goodies Finder.com where you can choose from over 12,000 cat related items including cat carriers, cat litter boxes and cat litter

Photo copyright and courtesy: Rebecca Richardson –  www.flickr.com

Articles by Sandy Robins: Writer for Cat Fancy Magazine & MSNBC News

| October 19, 2010
Sandy Robins: Writer for Cat Fancy Magazine & MSNBC News

Sandy Robins

As one of the USA’s leading multi-media pet lifestyle experts and authors, SANDY ROBINS documents the wonderful relationship that we have with our pets highlighting trends and innovative ideas as they happen. –  www.sandyrobinsonline.com

Behavior of Cats

| December 20, 2011
Behavior of Cats

Cats are also wonderful animals. They are friendly and quite conscious in every act. Prior to buying cats as pets, it is advised to learn about their behavior and nature. They do have some behavioral issues like using the litter box, biting, being destructive with their claws, and excessive attention seeking problem. Always remember that cats are not at all bad in behavior, they are just uninformed a little in their nature and need care given to them.

Cats are also wonderful animals. They are friendly and quite conscious in every act. Prior to buying cats as pets, it is advised to learn about their behavior and nature. They do have some behavioral issues like using the litter box, biting, being destructive with their claws, and excessive attention seeking problem. Always remember that cats are not at all bad in behavior, they are just uninformed a little in their nature and need care given to them. You must try to solve their behavioral problems one by one so that your pet cat does not feel confused and frustrated. Here are some most referred to behavioral issues in cats:

Attention-Seeking Behavior:

Cats do have attention-seeking behavior as well as increased vocalization when together. The causes of these things may differ from one cat to another like emotional problems, physical pain, excessive punishment to the cat, and so on. If they are suffering from Rippling Skin Disorder, this may also result in howling in the night hours.

Feeling Aggressive Towards Other Cats:

When you have cats in pairs or own more than 2 cats at home, it may result in fights between them. In case the aggression is continuous and active between cats, it will turn out to be ugly and you will have to interfere. The aggressive behavior between cats may occur because of some fear, redirected ruthless behavior, or due to some territorial issue.

Aggressive Behavior towards Humans:

The cats may feel angry towards people because of their master’s poor training in the early years, fear, love and many other factors. You must be able to deal with such behavior of your cat. Try to curb their scratching and biting activities.

Obsessive-Compulsive Behavior in Cats:

Just like human beings, cats can also involve themselves in obsessive-compulsive behavior. They will show such behavior in acts like feeling hypertensive, wool sucking, fur pulling and extreme licking. If you will understand the cause and will try your best to eradicate the problem, this will ensure speedy recovery of your cat.

 

Destructive and Harmful Chewing by Cats and Kittens:

Destructive chewing by cats is undesirable, first, because of the potential of danger to the cat, and second, because of damage to family valuables. Causes of destructive chewing by cats can range from teething in kittens to curiosity or boredom, and even because of a nutrient deficiency.

Destructive Scratching by Cats:

Are you troubled by harmful clawing by your cats? Please don’t consider Draconian measures such as declawing a cat. There are a number of ways you can keep your cats’ claws happily engaged in legal clawing with these articles and aids, while protecting furniture and carpeting. Look into getting a scratching post or tree.

Cat Urine Problems:

Inappropriate elimination (litter box avoidance) is the number one reason cats are surrendered to shelters. By eliminating physical causes, such as urinary tract infections, then targeting other common reasons for litter box avoidance, you can help your cat overcome this undesirable behavior. Remember that cats don’t like to use a dirty toilet any more than you would.

Shyness and Fear in Cats:

Is your kitty a “scardy-cat?” Shyness and fear stem from a number of causes, but can be overcome with gentleness and patience, as these tips explain. It is always important to allow your cat to set his own pace, and to be patient if his pace is slower than you had hoped for.

Stress and Anxiety in Cats:

While stress itself is not of behavioral origin, it can lead to a number of problems often considered behavioral, such as litter box avoidance or depression. When behavioral problems suddenly appear, savvy cat owners soon learn to first rule out signs of health problems, and next for stress factors, such as changes in the environment.

Copyright & Credit:

Article Source: www.ArticleBlast.com About The Author: Derrick Anderson To keep your cat safe see our selection of cat enclosures. To keep your other small pets protected from your cats try one of our rat cages for sale.

Photo copyright and courtesy: Viv Choi

Benefits of Cat Ownership

| December 26, 2011
Benefits of Cat Ownership

Scientific studies over the last 20 years have shown that pet owners are generally healthier than non pet owners

Cats have been associated with humans for at least 4,000 years – in ancient Egypt, their role in controlling rodents in grain was so important that cats were even worshipped as gods.

These days, over 31% of Australian households own a cat, and this probably has more to do with their popularity as companions than their ability to answer prayers. Cat owners receive many benefits from that companionship.

Scientific studies over the last 20 years have shown that pet owners are generally healthier than non pet owners – they suffer fewer minor illnesses and complaints, have better phychological health scores, and generally an improved overall feeling of “wellbeing”. The recent National People and Pets survey showed pet owners also visit the doctor significantly less.

Children who are raised with pets have a higher self esteem, and learn nurturing and social skills, as well as a sense of responsibility for others. Pets have been used very successfully as adjuncts to therapy, and the benefits to an elderly person of sitting with a cat curled up on the bed cannot be overestimated.

But perhaps the most compelling evidence for the benefits of cats came from a study of over 5,000 people conducted by the Baker Medical Research Institue in 1992 which found that cat owners (and dog owners) have significantly lower risk factors for heart disease than non cat owners, and that’s despite the fact that they drink more alcohol.
The key to these benefits is to be found in their unique qualities as companions.

Cats are extremely tactile, or “touchy” animals, and love to be patted and stroked, or just lie contentedly in the lap of their owners. Touch is a basic requirement for humans, as it is for all social species, and the companionship of a cat can be especially important for people who live alone.

Cats are also very entertaining, retaining a kitten-like playfulness and curiosity well into adulthood. People gain hours of relaxing pleasure watching their cats play, or just sitting listening to them purr. This relaxation is probably one of the major clues to the cat’s health effects – cats provide an easy antidote to the stresses of modern life.

The relative ease of care of a cat makes it the preferred pet in many circumstances. Cats do not need formal exercise as they will exercise themselves during play, and they can live comfortably in much smaller spaces than most dogs. Add the fact that they are naturally clean and fastidious animals, and it can be seen they are ideal pets for busy lifestyles. Cats also sleep two thirds of the day and will save their active time for when owners get home – an added bonus.

The same advantages apply to the elderly or incapacitated, who may not be able to meet the care needs of owning a dog.

Of course, most people don’t own cats just because they are practical. Cats have a certain character or personality which is distinctly their own. They are friendly and affectionate, yet retain an individuality and grace. most people own cats for the sheer joy of their “catness”.

Copyright & Credit:

© CATMATCH Reprinted as a courtesy and with permission from Catmatch www.cat-match.com.au CATMATCH began with an idea to help reduce the tens of thousands of cats and kittens that are put to sleep each year because they can’t find a home and someone to care for them. And yet there are people like you who would enjoy life with a cat.

Photo copyright and courtesy: Marcelo Camargo

Beware Internet Kitten Purchase Scams!

| September 30, 2017

Tracking and locating the perpetrators of these frauds is an expensive exercise, and has generally not yielded much success.

The Internet is a wonderful source of information and knowledge. However it is increasingly being used to operate scams and hoaxes, as many have discovered to their cost!  A number of complaints have been received by the Southern Africa Cat Council (SACC), from people who thought that they were buying pedigreed kittens via websites listed on the “Net”. They paid their “deposits”, as well as “courier fees”, often into South African bank accounts, and then waited in vain for the arrival of their new kitties!

These scam artists create bogus websites, using the cattery names of well-respected, registered and accredited cat breeders, and posting pictures of kittens and their “parent cats”, that they have downloaded from South African as well as international breeder websites. They run the bogus website for a few weeks, and then replace it with another, so as to be able to con yet another bunch of victims. The President of the SACC, a well known breeder of Burmese cats, discovered, to his horror, that there was a website using his cattery name, advertising kittens of a range of cat breeds that he certainly does not breed or own.

These “breeders” claim to be South African, they often advertise a range of “available” kittens for sale, such as Persians, Ragdolls, Maine Coons, Norwegian Forest, Sphynx etc, with a cell-phone number. When contacted and asked if it is possible to come and see the kittens, (and having established the buyer’s domicile), they will indicate that their cattery is based in another province.  The “sales” are always handled telephonically or via e-mail. Sometimes they will provide a landline telephone number, but closer inspection of the area code may indicate that the scammer is not based where he claims to be. If requested, a picture of the respective kitten may be sent electronically – more often than not down-loaded from the website of a legitimate breeder. They generally require a “deposit” to be paid, often as much as R2000.00 to R3000.00. After a short while, when the “buyer” tries to follow-up, there is no response from the contact numbers that were provided.

Tracking and locating the perpetrators of these frauds is an expensive exercise, and has generally not yielded much success. What is known and suspected about these scammers?

  • It is suspected that they originate in foreign countries, possibly China or India. (A short while ago a similar kitten scam, that focused on the sale of Sphynx kittens, was apparently being operated out of Nigeria!)
  • They probably do have a representative(s) in South Africa, who is able to open and close bank accounts.
  • Their knowledge of our South African geography is often limited, with little understanding of the distances between cities such as Cape Town and Port Elizabeth etc. Likewise their use of telephone number prefixes such as 021, 012, 031 etc is often a give-away.
  • Be wary of a “breeder” that is advertising an unusually large number of cat breeds and numbers of kittens e.g. 100 Maine Coon kittens! (Note: Some legitimate and respected breeders may focus on a number of different breeds, but when on one website, a large number of kittens, representative of some ten plus breeds, are advertised, this is often indicative of unscrupulous “back-yard” breeders or scam-artists).
  • Study the language proficiency and the content of the advertisement. The following are actual examples of text in scam-advertisements: “Kittens leaving at 9wks old, KUSA reg. (KUSA = Kennel Union of South Africa, for registration of pedigreed dogs!), or “…..we can use a shipingcompeny to have the kitten at you home adres when you pay deposit then contact me on my mobil number” (Ship a cat? Cats may be couriered or travel by air)
  • Beware of website addresses that have strange suffixes. South African websites typically end in .co.za or .com.

When considering the acquisition of a pedigree kitten, make every effort to visit the breeder and inspect the cattery. Check if the breeder and/or cattery is registered with the either the SACC (the Registrar of the South African Cat Register at 011 616 7017, or e-mail: sacatreg@iafrica.com) or the Cat Federation of Southern Africa (016 987 1170, e-mail: CFSARegister@gmail.com) or Cat Association of Southern Africa (CASA website: www.casawcf.co.za). Even though the advertiser may claim that his/her cats are SACC or CFSA registered, verify this for yourself. Finally, pedigreed kittens should never be re-homed under the age of 12 weeks, so be suspicious if younger kittens are being advertised as ready for re-homing.

Buying a pedigreed kitten should be a pleasurable experience, so please be particularly aware when buying “sight unseen” or via the internet. Too many people have been caught up in internet kitten-scams, and end up sorry, but hopefully wiser!

Copyright & Credit:
Article by
Doranne Way –  Official Press Release by the Southern Africa Cat Council
Article Source: ALL ABOUT CATS IN SOUTH AFRICA is a glossy, bi-monthly quality magazine focused on all things feline. Order the latest issue or subscribe online at  www.allaboutcats.co.za

banner ad
banner ad