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Recent Posts

Catification for Senior Pets

| March 11, 2018

 

Cat style expert Kate Benjamin shares her top products for senior felines — including nonslip mats, raised feeding dishes and heated beds. Which of these would your senior cat appreciate?
Amazon.com

Amazon.com

 

Aging is a fact of life for all of us, including our beloved feline family members.

Cats between 7 and 9 years old are considered senior cats; once our cats reach this life stage, there are certain needs we must look out for.

As cats age they may develop arthritis or other mobility issues, so you’ll need to make sure they have easy access to necessities like food, water, beds, litter and scratchers.

They also need things to keep them active, both mentally and physically. But meeting your senior cat’s needs doesn’t mean giving up on good design; catification is all about providing for your cat’s needs to climb, perch, rest and play without compromising the beauty of your home or your own personal style.

If you have a senior cat, or if you’re thinking about adopting one, make the most of the golden years and enjoy this special time together. Here are some simple ways to “catify” your home and help keep your older feline happy and healthy.

Read more here:

http://www.vetstreet.com/our-pet-experts/catification-for-senior-pets?Wt.mc_id=facebook

 

 

 

What to Consider When Finding a Pet Sitter

| February 27, 2018
What to Consider When Finding a Pet Sitter

Pet sitters care for your pet just a babysitter cares for your child while you are gone. Pet sitters do much more than just providing food and water.

If you own a pet chances are you might be faced with the need for someone reliable to look after your pet.

Pet sitters care for your pet just a babysitter cares for your child while you are gone. Pet sitters do much more than just providing food and water. A good pet sitter will look after your pet as you would yourself. A pet sitter will provide exercise, some playtime, some attention and also be aware if your pet needs veterinary attention.

People with exotic or particularly high maintenance pets will benefit from the services of a pet sitter.

Pet sitters will allow for the most positive experience your pets can have while you are away. Pet sitters offer the added advantage of allowing your pets to stay in their own environment while you are away. Your pet will be less stressed than if they where in one of the more traditional options for pet’s whose owners are away.

Pet sitters provide one on one attention and the special care that your beloved pet will require in your absence.

Hiring a pet sitter will not only give you peace of mind but will also save you worrying about your pet while you are away. Your home is also a lot safer. You have someone who will pick up the mail, water the plants and check on the general welfare of the entire home.

It’s worth the extra expense for the added peace of mind.

CHOOSING A PET SITTER

If you are going to go to the trouble to pay someone to look after your pet and home while you are gone, you will want to spend some time choosing the best pet sitter for you and your pet.

Make sure you see some qualifications.

Also make sure to ask for references, and follow up. This is the best way to get some idea of how reliable your pet sitter is. Glowing references are the best way to gauge which is the best pet sitter for your home.
You can start with the phone book or an online search. You can ask your Veterinarian for a reference. The vet often knows who the best pet sitter in the area is.

It’s best to line up a few different options. Arrange interviews with them all. Check to see how they interact with your animal. Many pet owners know hat animals can be fussy too!

When interviewing your prospective pet sitter it’s useful to see if the sitter asks a variety of questions too. The pet sitter should be interested in any medical conditions your pet might have, likes, dislikes allergies etc. If your sitter does not ask these questions rather choose someone who is genuinely concerned about the well being of your pet.

When choosing a pet sitter you don’t want to take any chances. After all it’s not just your pet who is vulnerable it’s the entire contents of your home too!

You can things a bit easier for your pet sitter too. Buying extra pet food and treats, leaving clear instructions and taking your pet for his regular checkups will ensure that things go smoothly. If you have a pet that is fussy or has a medical condition make sure you leave clear instructions for the sitter as to how to handle the situation.

Also if you have a complicated alarm system or security system make sure to explain clearly to the sitter how to get in and out, and how to secure the property in your absence. Leave a copy of your keys with a trusted neighbor and explain that you will be away. You can never have too many people keeping their eyes open.

Now that you know your pet and home are being well looked after, you can have a relaxed holiday. All that’s left to do is enjoy your vacation!

 

Copyright & Credit:
Article Source: www.a1articles.com
| Author: Eugenio Mccarthy   | To learn about chinchilla accessories and chinchilla colors, visit the Chinchilla Factswebsite.
Photo copyright and courtesy: AnneHe – stock.xchng

Kittycat Pet Sitting

| January 15, 2018

http://kittycatpetsitting.wixsite.com/kittycatpetsitting

When Cats Drool

| January 12, 2018
Oral problems and central nervous system disorders are common reasons for ptyalism and subsequent drooling

Oral problems and central nervous system disorders are common reasons for ptyalism and subsequent drooling

Cat owners are surely familiar with the behavioral signs of kitty contentment.  Happy cats will purr, knead their paws, and offer up a few head butts for good measure. Occasionally, cats really on cloud nine will drool on their owners.  As the owner of such a cat, I interpret the flow of saliva as the utmost compliment.  At the veterinary office, however, patients rarely drool with glee. In a veterinary setting, drooling more likely signifies that something is amiss.

Saliva is continuously produced by the salivary glands.  Excessive production and secretion of saliva is called ptyalism.  Oral problems and central nervous system disorders are common reasons for ptyalism and subsequent drooling.  Ptyalism should not be confused with pseudoptyalism, in which normal amounts of saliva is being produced, but it overflows from the mouth due to anatomic abnormalities, such as malocclusion (abnormal alignment of the teeth), or to an inability or reluctance to swallow because of pain associated with swallowing.

The initial step in determining the cause of a cat’s drooling is a thorough oral examination.  This may require sedation, tranquilization, or even general anesthesia, as cats with painful mouths are often head-shy and won’t allow a comprehensive exam.

Disorders of the teeth and gums are a common reason for drooling.  “Periodontal disease and the accompanying gingivitis, if severe, can lead to halitosis (bad breath), dysphagia (difficulty eating), and drooling”, says Dr. Theresa Paoloni, owner of Veterinary Care Unlimited in Ozone Park, New York.  “Periodontal disease is easily diagnosed during an oral examination, however, determination of the true extent of periodontal disease often requires oral radiographs”. Some cats experience gingivitis or stomatitis (inflammation of the entire mouth) of such severity that they paw at their mouth, refuse to eat hard food, and may drool excessively.  Biopsy of the gums or other affected oral tissues may reveal a severe infiltration of inflammatory cells. This condition, called “lymphocytic/plasmacytic gingivitis or stomatitis” is usually quite painful.  Treatment consists of antibiotics, anti-inflammatory medications, and in extreme cases, extraction of all of the teeth.    (See Sidebar: Tips on Keeping Your Cat’s Mouth Healthy)

 During an oral exam, the cat should be evaluated to see if it can close its mouth properly.  Some cats cannot, due to malocclusion.  Although congenital and developmental disorders are common causes of malocclusion, oral tumors can cause misalignment of the teeth and/or jaw, leading to improper closing of the mouth and subsequent drooling.  In fact, oral cancer is a very common cause of drooling in geriatric cats. Such was the case with “Milo”, an 18 year-old American Shorthair belonging to Amy Cousins.  Last May, Milo presented to my hospital with a mouth that was oozing foul-smelling drool.  Initially, it appeared as if severe periodontal disease alone might be the cause of his problem, however, upon extracting one of his diseased upper canine teeth, a piece of bone came loose, attached to the tooth root.  Submission of the bone specimen to the pathologist confirmed our fears: squamous cell carcinoma, an aggressive oral cancer.

Damage or paralysis of the trigeminal nerve (cranial nerve V) can lead to drooling secondary to an inability to close the mouth.  Lesions involving other cranial nerves (cranial nerve VII, IX, X, and XII) can also lead to drooling.  Fortunately, cranial nerve disorders are uncommon in cats.

Oral trauma and associated pain and discomfort can lead to drooling.  Broken teeth with resultant nerve exposure, a fractured jaw, and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders are traumatic injuries that often lead to pain and drooling.

Kidney failure is a very common condition, especially in geriatric cats.  Cats with severe kidney failure may have significant uremia (literally “urine in the blood”).  Uremic cats often develop ulcers on the gums, tongue, and edges of the lips.  These ulcers are painful, and many of these cats drool foul-smelling saliva as a result. These ulcers are readily visible on oral examination.

If the oral cavity is determined to be normal, other causes for drooling that should be considered include liver disease, nausea, seizure activity, and drug or toxic stimulation of salivation.

The liver’s job is to help remove toxins from the blood.  If the liver isn’t working properly, the toxins accumulate in the blood stream where they affect the brain. This is called “hepatic encephalopathy”, which translates to a mental condition due to liver dysfunction.  One liver disorder, called a “portosystemic shunt”, is a common cause of this, and is often seen in young cats.  This is a congenital abnormality in which blood coming from the intestinal tract bypasses or “shunts” around the liver rather than flowing through it.  Because the blood bypasses the liver, the liver never gets to detoxify it.  Typical signs of this (and other) liver disorders include behavioral changes, poor appetite, weight loss, excessive thirst and urination, vomiting, diarrhea, nausea, and drooling.  Compared to dogs, cats are much more prone to drooling as a result of liver disease.

Nausea is the first stage in the process of vomiting.  Although liver disease is a well-documented cause of nausea in cats, any disorder that causes nausea can lead to hypersalivation.

Various drugs and toxins can cause hypersalivation in cats.  Unpleasant tasting drugs can cause cats to salivate profusely.  The antiprotozoal drug metronidazole (Flagyl), the antihistamine chlorpheniramne (Chlortrimeton), and the sulfa antibiotics are particularly notorious for causing cats to salivate copiously if the pill inadvertently lands on the tongue during administration.  These drugs require a client that is proficient in pilling.  Overdosing of flea and tick insecticides can lead to ptyalism, as can the secretions of various toads and newts, and the venom of the black widow spider.  Various plants, including philodendron, diffenbachia, poinsettia, and Christmas trees can cause increased salivation. Household cleaning products can irritate the oral mucosa, resulting in hypersalivation.

Seizure disorders are not as common in cats as they are in dogs.  During a seizure, cats and dogs may drool secondary to reduced swallowing of saliva.

A systematic approach is necessary for diagnosing the underlying cause of drooling in cats.  Though it may seem obvious when a cat is drooling from happiness, any signs of illness, including oral discomfort, unusual behavioral changes, foul odor to the saliva, or saliva that is blood-tinged should be investigated by a veterinarian.

Sidebar:  Tips to Keep Your Cat’s Mouth Healthy

In celebration of Pet Dental Health Month, Rita Santiago, a certified veterinary dental technician working at Manhattan Cat Specialists in New York City, suggests the following tips for keeping your cat’s mouth in tip-top shape

  • Regular veterinary exams – a thorough oral examination, every six months, is essential.  Periodontal disease can be prevented if caught early.  Gingivitis, the earliest stage of periodontal disease, is reversible if detected early and treated promptly

  • Brushing your cats teeth  – brushing your cat’s teeth, ideally every other day, can go a long way toward preventing dental disease. Dental homecare should be introduced during kittenhood, so cats become used to having their lips lifted, their mouth and gums touch and handled, and their teeth brushed.  Specially designed toothbrushes and toothpastes for cats are available from veterinarians.

  • Oral rinses, gels, and sprays – cats with especially tender mouths, or those with established dental problems may benefit from these oral care products.  While brushing is best, rinsing helps protect and clean teeth on days that you cannot brush.

  • Treats and special diets – dental diets are a somewhat recent veterinary development. These diets are designed to prevent or dramatically slow the accumulation of tartar on the teeth.  Also available are dental chews for cats.  These offer an abrasive texture that help remove debris and plaque from your cat’s teeth. They come in flavors like fish or poultry.

Regular home maintenance, combined with frequent veterinary examinations will help your cat maintain a sound, healthy mouth for life.

Copyright & Credit:
Article Source:
Dr. Arnold Plotnick is a board-certified veterinary internist and feline specialist. He is the owner of Manhattan Cat Specialists, http://www.manhattancats.com , a full-service veterinary facility located in New York City. Dr. Plotnick is the medical editor of Catnip magazine and is a medical advice columnist on CatChannel. He authors his own blog “Cat Man Do” http://catexpert.blogspot.com

Photo copyright and courtesy: Mark Heath Photography

 

Novelty Biscuits

| January 3, 2018

Novelty Biscuits for all occasions

 

Order your specialised cat and dog biscuits for your animal loving friends and family on the following Facebook Page, or email:

thefrostedcat@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/thefrostedcat/

Novelty Biscuits

| January 3, 2018

Novelty Biscuits for all occasions

Specialising in cat and dog biscuits (for humans)

Order your specialised biscuits for your animal loving friends and family on Facebook or email:   thefrostedcat@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/thefrostedcat/

Novelty Biscuits

| January 3, 2018

 

Novelty Biscuits for all Occasions

Specialising in cat and dog Biscuits (for people)

Order your cat and dog biscuits for birthdays, parties, special occasions etc. for animal lovers here:

https://www.facebook.com/thefrostedcat/

 

 

Alleviating Stress in Your Cat

| December 28, 2017
Alleviating Stress in Your Cat

Cats are by nature independent, and like to be in control of things. When they are not, they can become very anxious and nervous. Some common causes of stress in cats include a move to a new home, travelling or being caged, visits to the vet, or the introduction of other cats within its domain.

 

Cats are by nature independent, and like to be in control of things. When they are not, they can become very anxious and nervous. Some common causes of stress in cats include a move to a  new home, travelling or being caged, visits to the vet, or the introduction of other cats within its domain.

Usual signs of stress include wild eyed frenzy accompanied with the desperate need to escape; irritability, including continual meowing; urinating or scent marking; and clawing at furniture, bedding, or carpets. Some of these symptoms are often mistaken for bad behaviour, but in order to cure the behaviour, one needs to reduce the levels of stress your cat is experiencing.

Feliway Feline Facial Pheromones (try saying this after you’ve had a drink) is a product recommended by vets to soothe and comfort stressed cats, and alleviate unwanted stress related behaviour. This product uses artificial feline pheromones that cats naturally emit from their facial area to mark a safe territory once they feel safe and secure within the confounds of the area. Cats do this by rubbing their faces on items within their area, giving off facial pheromones to mark the territory with their scent, which acts like a kind of kitty comfort blanket that gives them a sense of security and well-being.

The spray replicates the natural scent that cats leave when they perform this scent marking routine, and in so doing, offers a sense of security to alleviate anxiety and calm the cat down. Feliway feline pheromones offer an effective solution to reducing anxiety in distressed felines by replicating the cats natural mechanism that it would use to relay a sense of comfort and well-being, in order to help him cope with a stressful situation.

This product can be purchased in spray form, which is perfect for applying straight onto objects, for example spraying inside a travel cage to offer comfort and reassurance and alleviate stress associated with crating and travel.

The Feliway Feline Facial Pheromone Diffuser offers a novel method of keeping a well-adjusted, happy cat that always comes home to snuggle up in a cosy corner, or just laze contentedly around the house. The diffuser plugs into an electrical wall socket, giving off a continual burst of pheromones. Your cat will definitely believe that there is no place like home. Aside from relieving stress and worry in cats, this product is also great for controlling behaviour such as territory marking by urine spraying, and scratching the furniture, which are often related to stress associated with the introduction of a new cat or pet into your home (or rather, the cats home). The diffuser fills the room and the calming effect of the pheromones will help reduce anxiety and alleviate the behaviour associated with territory and scent marking.

The Feliway Feline Facial Pheromone diffuser comes with a 48ml vial, which lasts up to a month. Refills for the diffuser can be bought separately. Feliway Feline Facial Pheromones can also be bought in a 60ml spray bottle and a 15ml travel bottle for easy portability when needed away from the home.

Copyright & Credit:
Source:
www.submityourarticle.com | Alex KellyAs a pet owner, my articles are based on issues I feel are important for fellow animal lovers. Pet Promenade has everything you will need for the furry member of the family. From pet food, dog leads, grooming equipment and bird cages.With over 5000 pet products, at competetive prices, it’s worth paying us a visit at www.petpromenade.co.uk

Photo copyright and courtesy: Memories by Jules

About Your Cats Tongue

| October 27, 2017
About Your Cats Tongue. A feeling of rough sandpaper as you are licked by your cat is a reminder that its long, muscular tongue serves many functions, including grooming.

A feeling of rough sandpaper as you are licked by your cat is a reminder that its long, muscular tongue serves many functions, including grooming.

A feeling of rough sandpaper as you are licked by your cat is a reminder that its long, muscular tongue serves many functions, including grooming.

A Grooming Tool and More: A cats ability to groom itself is the result of numerous knobs called papillae on the surface of a cats tongue. Located at the tongues center, the papillae form backward-facing hooks containing large amounts of keratin, the same material found in human fingernails. These hooks provide the abrasiveness a cat needs for self-grooming. The strength of these hooks also helps a cat hold food or struggle with prey.

Your Help is Needed: Although the abrasiveness of a cats tongue helps it to clean itself and untangle its hair, your help is needed through regular grooming. As you groom your cat, you are removing loose and dead hair. Otherwise a cat may ingest this hair and hair balls can form, which can cause vomiting and may cause impaction in the gastrointestinal tract. Longhaired cats need daily grooming; shorthaired cats should be groomed at least once a week.

A Matter of Taste: Studies show that the cats sense of taste is keener than that of the dog. This acute sense of taste is the result of two sets of taste buds. Mushroom-shaped papillae at the tip and sides of the tongue hold some of the largest taste buds. A set of cup-shaped papillae are located at the back of the tongue. Palatability studies at the Purina Pet Care Center and other studies show that in addition to flavor, a cats tongue reacts to the texture or mouthfeel of a particular food. This is one of the reasons dry cat foods come in a variety of shapes. The cats tongue also reacts to temperature and shows a preference for foods at room temperature.

When Cats Lap it Up: A cats tongue becomes spoon-shaped to enable it to lap liquids. Notice how its tongue laps under water in much the same manner as an elephant uses its trunk. It flicks its tongue quickly in and out of the water, swallowing after every third or fourth lap. A cats water intake will vary depending on the season of the year, activity and type of diet being fed. Cats consuming canned cat food diets will not drink as much water as those fed dry food. If, for some reason, a cat does not appear to be drinking enough water, more water can be added to the food. Always keep fresh drinking water in a clean bowl available to your cat. Water is an essential ingredient and is involved in virtually every function of a cats body.

Contributing To A Cats Sense of Taste: Cats also have a highly developed sense of smell and they notice changes in their food. Some researchers suggest that this sense may stimulate their appetite or cause them to refuse to eat. A cats appetite may be affected by many factors including noise, strange people, changes in routine and even feeding dishes washed with a strong detergent and not carefully rinsed. However, if a cat refuses to eat for a period of two to three days, a trip to the veterinarian is in order. This continued food refusal may be a sign of illness.

Copyright & Credit:
Cat Article courtesy of  i-love-cats.com
Cat Author’s Website: http://www.i-love-cats.com/

Photo copyright and courtesy: Clix – stock.xchng

Feline Acne Facts and Treatment

| October 16, 2017
Several factors appear to be associated with its development including stress, a suppressed immune system, poor grooming habits, the presence of other diseases, contact or atopic dermatitis, and skin conditions in which abnormal amounts of oils are produced.

Several factors appear to be associated with its development including stress, a suppressed immune system, poor grooming habits, the presence of other diseases, contact or atopic dermatitis, and skin conditions in which abnormal amounts of oils are produced.

Feline acne is one of the skin problems which is easy to diagnose but might be hard to control. Feline acne is a common problem seen in cats. It is found on the cat’s chin & lips. It is generally accepted that this is caused by plastic bowls and for many cats the solution is simply substituting the plastic bowl for a stainless steel bowl or a glass bowl. The problem may be caused by the inability of the cat to clean his chin properly after drinking the milk resulting in a nutrient rich habitat for bacteria. Several factors appear to be associated with its development including stress, a suppressed immune system, poor grooming habits, the presence of other diseases, contact or atopic dermatitis, and skin conditions in which abnormal amounts of oils are produced. Feline acne is more common during the spring and fall shedding seasons, because this is when the body undergoes a cleansing process.

Causes

The exact cause of feline acne is not known, but several factors appear to be associated with its development including stress, a suppressed immune system, poor grooming habits, the presence of other diseases, contact or atopic dermatitis, and skin conditions in which abnormal amounts of oils are produced and the hair follicles do not function properly.

Symptoms

Telltale symptoms include a greasy appearance to their fur, especially around the facial area. You might also see dark spots in the fur around their face and jaw area.

However, even though your cat has the symptoms, it might not actually have Feline Acne. There are two contagious diseases that act like this Feline Acne. They are dermatophytosis and demodecosis. Or, the symptoms may be a result of your cat having a food allergy, an allergic reaction to plastic food bowls, or a yeast infection.

Feline Acne Treatment

The best way to treat kitty acne is to clean your pet’s surroundings regularly and thoroughly.

Sometimes, supplementation with fatty acids is beneficial in this type of treatment. Retin-A can be used but it can be applied very rare as it can leads to irritation. Oral retinoid therapy and teratogenic can be given to treat the feline acne in cats. Any underlying conditions such as ringworm, a Demodex infestation, or a yeast infection should be treated appropriately.

It may be helpful to switch food and water dishes to a stainless steel or glass variety in the event an allergic reaction may be a contributing factor (cats can be allergic to plastics and dyes). Using a very shallow dish can also be helpful.

Copyright & Credit:
Source:
Articlecat.com

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