banner ad
banner ad
banner ad

Two cats are better than one

| December 26, 2011
Two cats are better than one

Cat families usually play better in even numbers, so to create that balance of purrfect harmony in your home, think in pairs!

A cat is a warm, purring bundle of fun, always ready for a play with the kids or a peaceful moment curled in Mum or Dad’s lap. For time immemorial, cats have served, entertained and conjured thoughts of the simpler pleasures of home and health for their human companions. A cat truly makes a house a home, so imagine the joy two cats can bring!

Two cats together can be like a 24 hour floorshow, which has you laughing in the aisles. Whether you’re the spectator to the frolicking good game of tail chasey or the ever-popular feline pastime of “let’s see if we can both fit in the space behind the fridge”, you’re sure never to experience a dull or lonely moment with two cats in your life.

But have you ever considered the benefits a second feline friend can be for your new or existing best friend?

So many of us lead such busy on-the-go lifestyles, that often our most loyal companions are left without the benefit of our company. But just because it may not be in your cat’s nature to loudly protest, doesn’t mean your feline friend doesn’t pine for your company or become bored or lonely.

Cat families usually play better in even numbers, so to create that balance of purrfect harmony in your home, think in pairs!

Introducing a second cat to keep an existing cat company, or adoptiong two cats together, can be the ideal solution.

If you’re currently ‘catless’, then for you, choosing your new cat family can be as simple as adopting two kittens from the same litter. The time between 2 and 12 weeks of age is critical in cat socialisation, so kittens over the age of 8 weeks from the same litter are already likely to share a strong bond.

However, don’t be discouraged if you already have a cat and want to adopt a second, or want two kittens from different litters. Kittens of any age are ideal to be introduced to all manner of new family members, including people, other cats and even the family dog!

But what about introducing an adult cat, or even a new cat to a ‘fixture cat’, that has always ruled the roost solo? Rest assured, even the most independent cat can make friends with a new arrival, but it is important you introduce the two cats slowly and give them time to get used to each other.

The following should prove helpful:
A supervised first meeting is essential. Allow both to meet each other at their own pace, they will soon get to know each other or avoid each other until they feel more comfortable and are ready to become friends.

Keep the two cat’s food, water, litter and sleeping areas seperate until they are comfortable with each other. Don’t expect them to eat out of the same bowl or share the same litter tray at first, as these are the chief areas of feline territoriality.

Introducing your cats might require a little patience, but it will definately be worth the wait! In no time at all you’ll be coming home to two friends frolicking madly around the house like that endless floorshow.

Owners of elderly cats might be particularly surprised to see the mature and dignified puss they thought would never leave its favourite cushion enjoying a second kittenhood and whole new lease on life with a second cat around.

So, consider a friend to give your best friend’s life a lift and discover why, for both you and your beloved feline, two cats are most definately better than one!

Copyright & Credit:

© CATMATCH Reprinted as a courtesy and with permission from Catmatch www.cat-match.com.au CATMATCH began with an idea to help reduce the tens of thousands of cats and kittens that are put to sleep each year because they can’t find a home and someone to care for them. And yet there are people like you who would enjoy life with a cat.

Photo copyright and courtesy: Julie Wagner

Category: Feline Articles, Feline Health and Care, Feline Resources

Comments are closed.

banner ad
banner ad