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Will You Make These Three Lethal Mistakes Before You Bring Your New Cat Home?

| December 27, 2011
Will You Make These Three Lethal Mistakes Before You Bring Your New Cat Home

Bringing your new cat home can be fraught with dangers many people don't realize. You can make mistakes that can be lethal both to your new cat and to the cats you already own even before you introduce your new cat to the household.

Bringing your new cat home can be fraught with dangers many people don’t realize. You can make mistakes that can be lethal both to your new cat and to the cats you already own even before you introduce your new cat to the household.

Mistake #1: Failing to provide your cat with her basic vaccinations. This can happen if you adopt your cat from a friend, pick up a stray, select a kitten from a litter, pick up one from a cattery or purchase one from a pet shop.

The 5 basic vaccines a cat needs are:

  • Rhinotracheitis. This is one of the upper respiratory infections (URI) which cats can catch from other infected cats. It’s characterized by sneezing, drooling, and runny eyes and nose.

  • Feline Calicivirus (FCV). This is another URI, which has many of the same symptoms of Rhinotracheitis. Mouth ulcers may make it difficult for your cat to eat and drink.

  • Feline Chlamydiosis, also known as feline pneumonitis, affects birds but can also can be found in cats. Your cat will experience loss of appetite, fever, coughing and difficulty in breathing. This can lead to pneumonia.

  • Panleukopenia, otherwise known as ?distemper?. If your cat contracts this, her white blood cell count will fall below normal and her immune system won’t be able to fend off other diseases. Since the lining in her stomach can become damaged, she may begin to vomit and have severe diarrhea.

  • Rabies. This is the feared ?disease of all diseases?, which can be transmitted to humans through animal bites. Your cat’s brain will swell and she will initially experience severe thirst and ultimately go mad. You must have her vaccinated for Rabies.

These vaccinations are automatically taken care of when you adopt a cat from the Animal Shelter or the Humane Society, but many people who acquire cats in other ways are either not aware that their animals must be vaccinated, or think that their cat will be the exception and escape infection.

Keep firmly in mind that your cat probably will contract one of these (or all of them) if she is not vaccinated, and will expose you and your feline household to serious danger, particularly in the case of Rabies.

Mistake #2: Failure to get a complete medical checkup.

Strays that show up on your doorstep, or cats acquired in other ways, may have latent viral diseases that can be transmitted to the other cats in your household. If your new addition is already infected, vaccinating her will be a futile effort. If your existing cats are not infected but also not vaccinated, your new cat can infect them.

These infections are:

  • Feline Leukemia (FeLV). Your new cat will have a poor appetite and a dull coat. She may have a fever, which manifests itself as a warm, dry nose. Her mouth and gums may be inflamed.

  • Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV). This is an immune disease similar to FeLV but with symptoms that may not be readily apparent. It is similar to HIV in humans.

  • Feline Infections Peritonitis (FIP). Look for difficulty in breathing, weight loss, anemia, and fever.

Giardia is a parasite that can appear in cats kept in pet stores or catteries. It can kill aged cats and kittens.

Worms. There are three main varieties of worms, and all can be transmitted to your uninfected cats. Be sure to have your veterinarian check her for worms when you take her for her medical exam.

Mistake #3: Not collaring your cat and providing her with a nametag.

This should be done before you bring her home. Your cat might panic when you try to introduce her to the household (particularly when she meets the family dog), and if a door is open or there is some other way to get outdoors, she may bolt through it and escape.

She will not know where she is, and attempt to return to her former residence (wherever that was). In short, you may hear one terrified ?meow? and never see her again.

Unless, that is, she is wearing a collar and a nametag (preferably metal) with

  • her name

  • your name

  • your telephone number

firmly stamped on it. Getting a microchip embedded between her shoulder blades is also a good idea: it can give Animal Control complete information to return your kitty if she becomes lost.

Immediately taking these precautions as soon as you adopt your cat can save a lot of grief in that initial introduction, and ensure that your new kitty enjoys a long and happy life in her new home.

 

Copyright & Credit:Article Source: www.a1articles.com | At the age of 62, John Young is a writer who has owned one cat or another since he was four. He is the author of ?Your New Cat’s First 24 Hours”. He has written it for cat owners who want to safely introduce a new cat to the household and subsequently provide her with necessary care. You may find his new book at http://www.yourcatsecrets.com¬† . He lives in California with his wife and his pet cat ‘Bear’.

Photo copyright and courtesy: Peter Habram Рstock.xchng

Category: Feline Articles, Feline Health and Care, Feline Resources

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